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                        [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27
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                        [post_content] => First Time Buyer's Guide For Customers At [resource_dealer_name]
    
    
    

    Buying a car for the first time in [resource_dealer_address type=state] can feel like an overwhelming experience. That’s why we put together this list of essentials every car buyer near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] should be armed with before they step on the lot at [resource_dealer_name].





    What’s inside?

    + A road map for car-buying success.

    + Realistic, actionable steps that anyone can take when starting their first car buying experience at [resource_dealer_name].

    CLICK BELOW TO GET STARTED

    [post_title] => First Time Buyer's Guide [post_excerpt] => Buy with confidence. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => first-time-buyers-guide [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/first-time-buyers-guide/ [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937506 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content] => Financing A Car For The First Time In [resource_dealer_address type=state]?

    [resource_title]

    This extensive guide for customers near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] will ensure your first experience at [resource_dealer_name] is
    STRESS FREE and will SAVE YOU MONEY

    Get Your Checklist NOW From [resource_dealer_name]!

    Here’s What You’ll Learn With Your FREE Guide From [resource_dealer_name]:

    • Check your credit score
    • Get pre-approved for credit
    • Determine a down payment amount
    • Estimate your payments

    • Build your credit after the purchase
    • Make your first loan payment

    Click below to get started

    Get Your FREE Guide NOW!

    [resource_dealer_name] Hates Spam

    • We will not spam you, sell or lease your information
    • We value you and will not abuse or misuse your information

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    [resource_title]


    We've all been there before. You're driving along in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] when you notice a yellow light out of the corner of your eye. A quick glance at the dash confirms your fear: your check engine light is on. What is the light trying to tell you? Should you panic? Your check engine light, or Malfunction Indicator Lamp, could mean a number of things. It could be a misfiring engine, a broken oxygen sensor, or simply a loose gas cap.

    When you see your check engine light blink on while you are on your way to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], it doesn't necessarily mean you need to pull your car over to the side of the road and call a tow truck. It does, however, mean that you should get the car checked out at [resource_dealer_name] as soon as possible. In other words, whatever you do, do not ignore your check engine light. You may be trying to avoid expensive repairs, but if you continue to prolong it, the repairs will become more expensive and you may be putting yourself in danger by continuing to drive your car around [resource_dealer_address type=state]. In any case, even if you’re sure it’s a false alarm, you should schedule a service appointment at [resource_dealer_name], just to be safe.

    Until then, here are some tips to help you decide what to do in the event that your check engine light does come on near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]:

    • Whether your vehicle is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] or another make, the first thing you should do is look for a serious problem that requires immediate attention. Check your dashboard gauges and lights for indications of low oil pressure or overheating, either of which would require you to pull over and shut off the engine as soon as you find a safe place to do so. On some cars, a yellow check engine light means you should investigate the problem, while a red or blinking check engine light means you should stop immediately and seek assistance at [resource_dealer_name] in [resource_dealer_address type=city].

    • If your car doesn’t seem to be in immediate danger, try tightening your gas cap. A loose cap could be transmitting an error message to your car’s computer and reporting a problem with the emission system. If your only problem is a loose gas cap, it’s an easy fix. However, you should note that your check engine light will not immediately turn off after you tighten the cap.

    • After you’ve gotten yourself out of immediate and present danger, it’s time to make an appointment at [resource_dealer_name] near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] to have your engine checked by a professional. If you want to diagnose the malfunction yourself, you can purchase a scan tool at your local auto parts store in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] for anywhere from forty to several hundred dollars, depending on the features you’re looking for. A scan tool will give you instructions on how to decipher the engine light codes, and while it may be a reasonable investment, you might feel more comfortable going directly to a service [resource_toggle_verbiage us="center" ca="centre"]. A service technician will be able to diagnose your problem and help you proceed if repairs are necessary.

    • In any case, if you’re not sure what the problem is, reduce your speed and, if possible, the weight you’re carrying. For example, if you’re towing a trailer, it would be a good idea to stop and assess the situation before you continue towing. If stopping is not an option, have your vehicle checked as soon as possible to prevent expensive damage.


    If your check engine light is on right now, bring your vehicle into [resource_dealer_name] for inspection. Our expert service technicians can help with the issue. We're located at [resource_dealer_address type=all].

    Again, your check engine light could indicate something simple like a loose gas cap or something serious like a bad catalytic converter. However, even if you don’t think it’s a big deal, you should still diagnose the issue or get your engine checked by a professional. Repairs will only become more costly over time, and putting off repairs can lead to dangerous driving conditions in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4]. When it comes to driving, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Keep yourself and your vehicle safe in [resource_dealer_address type=city]; don’t ignore your check engine light.


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    Does Regular Vehicle Maintenance at [resource_dealer_name] Make You Safer?


    Does Regular Vehicle Maintenance Make You Safer?

    It can be difficult to justify spending additional money on your vehicle when you feel like it’s running smoothly, which is why regular vehicle maintenance can come as an afterthought. However, by not taking proper care of your vehicle, you’re taking a risk. You’re trusting that everything is working correctly with your car—even the things you can’t detect yourself.

    Not only are you putting yourself at risk, you’re also putting other drivers at risk. If something inside your vehicle should break while driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city], it could cause you to lose control or reduce visibility while driving. Regular vehicle maintenance can help catch anything that might be a problem before it becomes one, preserving your vehicle (and your investment) in the process.

    What should be checked during regular vehicle maintenance at [resource_dealer_name]?

    1. Oil

    Your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] can’t run without a proper oil level, so it should be changed regularly according to the guidelines in your owner’s manual.

    2. Windshield Wipers

    Your windshield wipers may be on the verge of breaking without you even knowing it. Check your wipers regularly to avoid getting caught in a rainstorm without working ones.

    3. Tire Pressure

    If your tires aren’t properly inflated, it could lead to a blowout and cause an accident or leave you stranded in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].


    [resource_dealer_name]'s service technicians will check all of these areas when performing routine maintenance on your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes].

    4. Brakes

    Brake pads wear down over time, and without them you can’t stop your car, which can lead to bad accidents for you and for other drivers.

    5. Power Steering Fluid

    Without power steering, it can be very difficult to control your vehicle. By keeping your power steering fluid levels where they belong, you can maintain full control over your car at all times.

    6. Battery Voltage

    Your car needs proper battery voltage to start. If you ever need to jump it, you’ll want this to be taken care of.

    7. Alignment

    If you find that your car is drifting to one side or the other while you’re driving, you may need a realignment to be sure your wheels are pointing straight and to avoid accidents.

    8. Antifreeze/Coolant

    Cold weather conditions can really take a toll on your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes]. Use antifreeze and coolant to keep your car safe from ice and snow that can cause skidding on the road and damage to parts.

    9. Tire Tread

    Tires need traction in order to grip the road properly. If your tires are threadbare, you run the risk of losing control while braking.

    10. Lights

    Lights are essential for your vehicle to communicate what you’re doing with other drivers. Whether it’s a turn signal or a brake light, this will increase your visibility and make you safer.

    It can be difficult to justify the hassle and cost of scheduling regular vehicle maintenance, especially if you still have a monthly payment. However, by having your car checked regularly, you’re protecting yourself, your passengers, and other drivers. It’s impossible to put a price on your safety, so regular maintenance is well worth the cost.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a local dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => Does Regular Vehicle Maintenance Make You Safer? [post_excerpt] => By not taking proper care of your vehicle, you’re taking a risk. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => does-regular-vehicle-maintenance-make-you-safer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/does-regular-vehicle-maintenance-make-you-safer/ [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937497 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    How Do Lemon Laws Work Near [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?


    How Do Lemon Laws Work near [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?

    A “Lemon” is a car that a buyer discovers is defective after they purchased it. Whether you bought your car in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], or elsewhere, if you find your car breaks down frequently or does not perform like the seller promised, then there is a good chance you have a Lemon on your hands. The warranty given to you upon delivery in [resource_dealer_address type=state] should cover problems with the car. However, if the problem cannot be fixed after multiple trips to the repair shop, or if the manufacturer does not honor the warranty, then there are steps you can take to protect your rights as a consumer.

    These laws are nicknamed Lemon Laws and the government created them to protect and compensate you for products that fail to meet the expectations set by the manufacturer. Lemon Laws most commonly apply to used cars, but in some states they may apply to leased cars as well. Each state, including [resource_dealer_address type=state], has a unique set of laws, but we can provide a general overview of how Lemon Laws work.

    Do I have a Lemon?

    The laws may vary by state, but a car bought around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] can generally be considered a Lemon if it meets a few criteria:

    1. The car must have a defect that lingers after 3-4+ repair attempts. Each state will specify the number of repair attempts to consider a car a Lemon.
    2. The defect must be “substantial” and covered by warranty. The attempts to remedy the defect must happen within the specified warranty time.
    3. The car must be in the shop or out of service for a specific number of days in its first to second year. If people living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] spend 25-30 days with their vehicle out of service the car is considered a Lemon.

    For example, a customer in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] or [resource_dealer_address type=city] buys a car in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and discovers that his brakes are defective. The customer takes it to a mechanic near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]. The mechanic in then has possession of the car for over 30 days, maybe because it is a complex job or must wait for ordered parts to arrive, the customer’s car is a Lemon and they can be compensated.

    Criteria 1 and 2 are the most common, and many states also apply 3, but not every state.


    [resource_dealer_name], located in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] has certified technicians who can help

    What Constitutes a “Substantial Defect?”

    Around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] to be classified as a “substantial defect” the problem cannot have been caused by use of the car after purchase. The defect must impair the use, value, or safety of the car. This means that safety defects such as brake problems and steering issues are covered, but aesthetic paint chipping may not be. The defect also must occur within a certain period, typically within 1 or 2 years or 12,000-24,000 miles after purchase.

    The difference between “substantial defect” and other, more minor defects is a gray area among many states. Always check the definition of a Lemon in [resource_dealer_address type=state] to see if any of your defects can be covered. Do note that the defect cannot be a result of abuse of the car or misuse.

    How Many More Times?

    In [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] the criteria for reasonable number of repairs is a vital component of Lemon law. Once the manufacturer is given notice of the defect they have a certain number of attempts to repair the problem. If a permanent solution to the problem cannot be found within this number then the car is considered a Lemon. The number of attempts will vary by state and type of defect. A major safety defect may only get one reasonable attempt, while paint defects may get a couple.

    Making Lemonade

    If it is deemed that your car meets the Lemon law requirements in [resource_dealer_address type=state] then you have the right to get a replacement car or refund from the manufacturer. Note that it will not come from the dealer or seller you bought it from, but from the manufacturer. Before you are eligible for a refund you must first notify the manufacturer. They may try to repair it again or offer a settlement. If the settlement is unsatisfactory then you can go to arbitration. If arbitration does not succeed then the case can go to court.

    As stated earlier, the manufacturer typically has about four attempts to remedy the defect within the warranty before a car can be considered a Lemon. You will need to keep a record of each visit to the mechanic with dates to compare to the date of purchase. The more evidence brought to the manufacturer, the greater your chance for receiving a refund or replacement car. Invoices showing the car was repaired multiple times in its first year will go a long way to proving you bought a Lemon.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a local [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    Stay Safe With This FREE Guide

    Be prepared, no matter what.

    [post_title] => What To Keep In Your Emergency Roadside Kit [post_excerpt] => Guide for What To Keep In Your Emergency Roadside Kit [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-to-keep-in-your-emergency-roadside-kit [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 20:31:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 20:31:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/what-to-keep-in-your-emergency-roadside-kit [menu_order] => 8 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937498 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    [resource_title]


    What's wrong with my car?

    Congratulations! You and your vehicle have been through quite a bit in your first [resource_toggle_verbiage us="30,000 miles" ca="32,000 km"] together traveling around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and have reached a new pinnacle. What are we talking about? We’re talking about [resource_toggle_verbiage us="30,000-mile" ca="32,000 km"] maintenance of course!

    You may be wondering if you really need this service. Most likely, you’ve been experiencing few, if any, problems. By getting [resource_toggle_verbiage us="30K mile" ca="32K km"] service, you are not only protecting your investment, but you are also ensuring that your new [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] warranty remains in effect. Forgoing a service appointment is a big risk that will prevent you from getting the most out of your precious investment.

    What will the [resource_dealer_name] mechanics do?

    The answer varies based on the make and model of your vehicle. Manufacturers often have differences of what is involved in a [resource_toggle_verbiage us="30K mile" ca="32K km"] service and may even have different standards for each of their models. To find the best plan for your vehicle, check your car’s manual for exact details on what you need for your [resource_toggle_verbiage us="30K mile" ca="32K km"] service. Going to a licensed dealership like [resource_dealer_name], will also help you get the correct and best service for your vehicle.

    In a general sense though, there are a few things the [resource_dealer_name] mechanic may do for your vehicle. Some of these things include an oil change, air filter, tire rotation, new transmission fluid, fuel filter, and a thorough inspection.

    What will the [resource_dealer_name] mechanic look for?

    During their inspection, your mechanic will look for problems with your vehicle in it’s most important areas. The first inspection may be for your brake and cooling systems. These parts of your car make sure that everything is working correctly and running smoothly. The mechanic may also check your spark plugs to make sure that they are still functioning and may replace them if necessary. After this, the mechanic might inspect your belts, fluids, differential, shocks, tires, wiper blades, lights/bulbs, and front suspension. Like mentioned before, this will vary by manufacturer recommendations, so make sure you’re getting the best service by going to a manufacturer-partnered dealership, like [resource_dealer_name].

    What problems will this prevent?

    Having regular maintenance is important and could save you thousands in emergency service down the road. You might think that you’re only experiencing a small issue and that it’s okay to wait until the problem gets worse. However, even the smallest components of your car can have serious consequences. You wouldn't want to be stuck, broken down in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], would you? Missing on your service appointments is a big risk to yourself and your vehicle. You may be trying to avoid expensive repairs, but if you continue to prolong it, the repairs will become more expensive and you may be putting yourself in danger by continuing to drive your car. Repairs will only become more costly over time and putting off repairs can lead to dangerous driving conditions. When it comes to driving, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Keep yourself and your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] safe


    [resource_dealer_name] is a local dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => Why Do I Need A 30K Mile Service Appointment? [post_excerpt] => There could be issues under the hood that you aren’t aware of. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => why-do-i-need-a-30k-mile-service-appointment [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/why-do-i-need-a-30k-mile-service-appointment/ [menu_order] => 9 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937500 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content] => Find Your Perfect Vehicle At [resource_dealer_name]

    Find Your Perfect Vehicle At [resource_dealer_name]

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    Our free vehicle request service is guaranteed to find the perfect fit for you if you live near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4]. You can fully customize every aspect of what you’re looking for, or simply type in a make and model you aren’t finding in our current inventory and we’ll get it for you.


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    After taking this quick one step process [resource_dealer_name] will get to work finding your perfect vehicle before visiting our dealership. We have a comprehensive process for getting you behind the wheel of the vehicle you want. There are no hidden charges or obligations; you will pay absolutely nothing out of pocket for us to find your next vehicle.

    What you get:

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    [post_title] => Find Your Perfect Vehicle [post_excerpt] => Use our quick and easy vehicle request service to find exactly what you’re looking for. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => find-your-perfect-vehicle [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/find-your-perfect-vehicle/ [menu_order] => 11 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937502 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content] => Cash for Car

    Receive an instant cash offer on your vehicle from [resource_dealer_name]!

    Use our quick and easy vehicle appraisal service if you live near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] to find out exactly how much we’ll buy your car for!

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    Why Sell [resource_dealer_name] Your Car:

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    You don’t have to wait to receive your money. We will have a check waiting for you within 24 hours at our [resource_dealer_address type=city] dealership.

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    The process is simple and can be started from the comfort of your home in [resource_dealer_address type=state].

    The process is simple…

    After you’re all set, the [resource_dealer_name] team will contact you with a cash offer for your vehicle. We will have a check waiting for you in 24 hours.

    [post_title] => Receive an Instant Cash Offer For Your Vehicle [post_excerpt] => Find out exactly how much we’ll buy your car for! [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => receive-an-instant-cash-offer-for-your-vehicle [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/receive-an-instant-cash-offer-for-your-vehicle/ [menu_order] => 12 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937504 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content] => Should I Lease Or Buy My Vehicle At [resource_dealer_name] In [resource_dealer_address type=city]?

    Should you lease or buy your next vehicle at [resource_dealer_name]? There's no one answer for everyone because it all depends on your lifestyle and needs. Don't worry though: we've made things simple to help you pinpoint what your next step should be if you live near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].





    What’s inside?

    + A breakdown of the pros and cons of buying or leasing your next vehicle in [resource_dealer_address type=state].

    + Real-world advice about what to expect--no matter which you choose.

    + Still not sure? We've included a quiz at the end to help things along.

    CLICK BELOW TO GET STARTED

    [post_title] => Should I Lease Or Buy My Vehicle? [post_excerpt] => It all depends on your lifestyle and needs. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => should-i-lease-or-buy-my-vehicle [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/should-i-lease-or-buy-my-vehicle/ [menu_order] => 17 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937485 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    I Live In [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], near [resource_dealer_address type=city],[resource_dealer_address type=state]. How Long Should My Alternator Last?


    How Long Should My Alternator Last?

    Your alternator is a part of your vehicle’s engine that is essentially an electrical generator. As your vehicle runs around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], [resource_dealer_address type=state], the alternator converts mechanical energy into electrical energy, powering and providing a continuous charge to the battery, onboard computer, and other electrical components.

    While your battery is what starts your vehicle, it is the alternator that powers the electronics within your car as you listen to music, punch in directions, or just drive around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], or [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]. The typical lifespan of an alternator in [resource_dealer_address type=city] varies significantly depending on the amount of wear placed on the device, as well as aftermarket components and the [resource_dealer_address type=state] climate you drive in.

    [resource_dealer_name] Tips To Tell If Your Alternator Might Be Broken If:

    • The brightness of your headlights fluctuates rapidly during night conditions in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]
    • The smell of burning electronics is coming from your engine or battery while cruising around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1]
    • Your “Alternator Warning Light” or an alert for another electronic component is illuminated
    • Your radio or other electronics don’t consistently function

    [resource_dealer_name] Offers Tips To Maintain Your Alternator By:

    • Ensuring all aftermarket electronic devices are installed correctly
    • Properly jump-starting your car in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], or anywhere, when necessary
    • Making sure there are no fluids or leaks seeping into the alternator
    • Ensuring all belts are at proper tightness – an overly snug fit can cause undue stress on your vehicle’s charging system
    • Taking your vehicle to a professional if you suspect something is wrong with your battery or alternator


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => How Long Should My Alternator Last? [post_excerpt] => The typical lifespan of an alternator varies. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-long-should-my-alternator-last [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/how-long-should-my-alternator-last/ [menu_order] => 18 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937494 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    [resource_dealer_name] Explains Why You Should Recycle Motor Oil In [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    Re-refining oil and how it benefits all of us in [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    As consumers, we’ve heard a lot about oil, renewable energy and properly disposing of and recycling our used oil. But what does it mean to you and how does it work?

    [resource_dealer_name] Wants You To Know The benefits of re-refined oil around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    Re-refining used oil aids our planet in several ways. It uses existing rather than organic resources, and also uses less energy than refining virgin oil.

    Oil isn’t the only limited resource we save by recycling. It only takes [resource_toggle_verbiage us="¼ gallon" ca="0.9 litre"] of oil to contaminate [resource_toggle_verbiage us="250,000 gallons" ca="nearly 950,000 litres"] of water. When we recycle used motor oil, it re-uses an existing resource and keeps oil from polluting and contaminating our water supply.

    What happens to your recycled oil?

    Motor oil becomes contaminated over time by dirt, water, and metal particles. That means it’s less effective in protecting the mechanics of a vehicle. When we get our oil changed, we take out dirty oil and replace it with new, clean oil.

    The oil from your car goes through a purification process to remove dirt and debris. The first stage is called dewatering; dirty oil is placed into settling tanks where it sits until the water separates from the oil and can be removed.

    Next, used oil goes through a re-refining process to become either motor oil, industrial burner oil, lubricating oil, transformer oil, or fuel. Depending on how your oil will be used, it undergoes various recycling stages. These include:

    • Filtering: Removing solid debris from the oil
    • Demineralization: Removing additives from the oil
    • De-asphalting: Removing asphalt from the oil
    • Distillation: Fractioning the oil by boiling for further processing
    • Solvent Extraction: Removing compounds by dissolving them
    • Hydrofinishing: Improving the stability of sulfur and oxygen

    Oil can be re-refined over and over again for any purpose. This process of re-refining holds up to the same standards as the process for refining crude oil.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving [resource_dealer_address type=city ], [resource_dealer_address type=state ], located near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].

    We at [resource_dealer_name] believe you don’t have to pay more to help the planet!

    When choosing what kind of oil you’ll put back into your car in [resource_dealer_address type=city], consider this: re-refined oil is the same quality as newly refined crude oil. There is little to no difference in quality and in price.

    When you choose recycled oil over newly refined crude oil, you’re making a decision to help our environment without compromising value.

    Are you due for an oil change? Give [resource_dealer_name] a call at [resource_dealer_phone type=service] to schedule your next appointment. We’re happy to help no matter what your vehicle needs are in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state].


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    [resource_title]


    Common car troubles around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] and what they might mean

    What's wrong with my car?

    Every vehicle is made up of an intricate system of mechanics, electrical parts and fluids. Most car owners can sense when something has disrupted that system—it might be a funny smell, an odd noise or a car that won’t even start. While it may be easy to tell when something is wrong, it can sometimes be difficult to figure out exactly what’s going on and why.

    In most cases, it’s best to see a mechanic in [resource_dealer_name]'s Service Center who can tell you what is wrong with your vehicle with 100 percent certainty, but it helps to go in to your service appointment with a little knowledge on what might be causing your car troubles.

    [resource_dealer_name] explains four common car troubles.

    1. Vehicle Won’t Start

    In [resource_dealer_address type=state] most of the time when your vehicle won’t start, it’s due to a dead battery. You’ll either need to recharge it by jumping it and leaving your car running awhile, or replace it all together. If you car will crank, but not turn over to start, there could be problems with your ignition, spark plugs or fuel injectors. It’s best to call a mechanic to have it looked at.

    2. Heater/AC Problems

    There could be a number of things preventing your heat or air conditioning from working. It could be an issue with the condenser that’s either broken, or clogged with debris like bugs and leaves. Additionally, your cabin air filter could also be clogged with debris, obstructing airflow in the vehicle. Your AC could blow out hot or warm air when your Freon charge is low, or the refrigerant is leaking. See your mechanic near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] to have it recharged or replaced.

    3. Rotten Egg Smell

    If your engine is giving off a rotten egg smell, what you smell is hydrogen sulfide, which comes from the sulfur in the fuel. Your vehicle’s catalytic converter transforms the odorous hydrogen sulfide into sulfur dioxide, which has no smell. So, when your converter breaks or clogs, you will start to notice the smell of sulfur, or rotten eggs. In most cases, you’ll have to have your catalytic converter replaced by your mechanic, as it’s rare that it can be repaired.

    4. Secure it

    You are approaching a stop light in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and your notice your brakes are making noise. Squeaking, squealing or screeching breaks are usually the result of vibrations between the brake pads and rotors. With low-cost or semi-metallic break pads, you will hear noise coming from them as you brake. This can usually be fixed using a lube or paste bought at a parts store. However, it could also be a sign of worn down brake pads that, if not replaced, can damage the rotor, drastically increasing repair costs. If your brakes are making a lot of noise, it’s best to see a mechanic to accurately diagnose the problem or you could end up with more car troubles on your hands.


    Similar to the risk associated with self-diagnosing an illness, you shouldn’t try and diagnose a problem with your car unless you really know what you’re looking for. If you’re experiencing any of these common car problems, it’s best see a trusted mechanic at [resource_dealer_name] who can tell you with accuracy what’s going on and help you fix it.

    If you need someone to help you figure out what’s wrong with your vehicle, book an appointment for service give us a call at [resource_dealer_phone type=service]


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    What is a Powertrain Warranty Near [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?


    A warranty is a statement made by either the seller or the manufacturer of a product or service promising that the product will perform in a specified way for a specified period. This means that if the product does not perform in the way specified within the predetermined time, the manufacturer will repair or replace it. A powertrain warranty is just one specific type of warranty. In a general, it is a promise from the seller or manufacturer to repair or fix an issue with the parts of the powertrain should a malfunction arise.

    The powertrain of a car consists of many components, including:

    • Engine
    • Transmission
    • Driveshaft
    • Internal workings of the engine

    Simply put, the powertrain is what provides power to the car. Here’s how it works:

    • The engine creates power for the car and transmits it to the driveshaft through the transmission.
    • The sensors that are generally included in a powertrain warranty provide input and output to and from the powertrain control module (PCM).
    • Some sensors send the computer information, which transcribes the information and sends it to output sensors.

    A powertrain warranty covers almost anything that is used to bring power to the wheels. If you are driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and one of these essential parts of the vehicle break down or become unusable, your powertrain warranty will replace or repair the part at no cost to you. These are some of the most important parts of the vehicle and, as a result, some of the most expensive to repair or replace. This is one of the biggest selling points of a powertrain warranty. It allows you to breathe easy knowing that your car’s most expensive systems are covered in full. Powertrain warranties have become essential in purchasing a car and most dealers now offer them in one form or another. Oftentimes they are one of the longest lasting warranties available. If a mechanical problem arises within the powertrain and the warranty states that it will cover it, either the manufacturer or dealership will have to pay for the repairs.

    Of course, what the warranty covers varies greatly between vehicles, manufacturers, and dealerships. When looking to buy a vehicle, you should check the warranty carefully and be sure to understand all its terms and conditions. The fine print, as with any contract, is the main difference between warranties. This means that different manufacturers and dealers will offer different kinds of coverage. Each party will have its own interpretations of what should be covered (but almost all will cover the parts listed earlier). One major difference will probably be the coverage of the engine. Some vehicles have “long block” engines, which means that the engine and everything attached to it cannot be removed. Others have “short block” engines where only part of the engine is removable. Since all engines are different, engine coverage in powertrain warranties will differ, as well. This is another reason to carefully examine the details of your warranty policy.

    Another thing that will affect the powertrain warranty is the car itself. Does it have automatic or manual transmission? If you drive a manual, the warranty will probably differ. Check your warranty to see if important parts like the clutch are covered.


    Lifetime and Limited Powertrain Warranties

    Another difference between powertrain warranties is how long they last. In [resource_dealer_address type=city] a limited warranty will only provide coverage within a specified time period – usually five, seven, or ten years. A lifetime or full warranty, on the other hand, does not have a time expiration. It will cover you for the lifetime of your vehicle. A lifetime warranty, however, does not often cover parts that wear out from regular wear-and-tear, like clutches, boots, and CV joints.

    For a more extensive list of what is covered by your powertrain warranty, contact your vehicle’s manufacturer or [resource_dealer_name].

    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    Decode Your Dashboard for [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes]s


    A guide to common dashboard indicator lights

    Decode Your Dashboard For [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes]

    You are driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and one of the lights on your dashboard pops on! But what does it mean? [resource_dealer_name] is here to give you a breakdown of common dashboard lights and their meaning.

    There are a lot of lights on your dashboard that might flash from time to time while in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] or [resource_dealer_address type=city], but do you know what they mean? Most indicate some sort of problem with your vehicle's operating system, although it generally takes a bit more investigation to find out the extent of the issue.

    However, it's always useful to have a basic understanding of what these lights mean incase it's something that needs to be dealt with immediately at [resource_dealer_name]. Not all of these lights are universal, so the only way to know for sure is to consult your owner's manual. However, this guide will give you a general synopsis of the lights most commonly used by manufacturers.

    Check Engine

    This means the engine computer has detected some abnormality and logged a Diagnostic Trouble Code that your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealer can scan to identify the issue. If your check engine light begins flashing, the issue is serious and you should not attempt to drive your vehicle.

    Battery

    Signals that your car’s voltage has dropped below acceptable levels and is not correctly being charged by your vehicle. Your alternator belt, battery terminals, and battery will all need inspection at [resource_dealer_name].

    Coolant Temperature

    Your engine is too hot! You’ll need to look at fans, your radiator cap, check coolant levels, and for leaks.

    Transmission Overheating

    Your transmission is running hot. Make sure you have adequate transmission fluid and engine coolants.

    Oil Pressure Alert

    If this remains on, your vehicle is losing oil pressure. Check both oil level and pressure that instant.

    Oil Change Reminder

    This means that your oil life has reached 0% and needs changing. This is determined by your vehicle’s computer based on miles driven and other data.

    Service Soon

    This is an indicator of several possible electrical problems including malfunctioning exterior lights, traction control, or internal communication. It is recommended that you service your vehicle as soon as possible at [resource_dealer_name].

    Tire Pressure Monitoring System

    There is a tire with low air pressure or a sensor has misfired. Check tire pressure accordingly, and visit your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership if the light cannot be manually reset.

    Brakes

    This indicates the parking brake is engaged or that something is wrong with your brakes or ABS. Make sure brake fluid levels are correct and the parking brake is completely off. A more complicated issue may require the help of a [resource_dealer_name] technician.

    Reduced Power Warning

    A broken component has caused your engine’s computer to limit engine output to safe levels to compensate for the issue. Your car’s CPU will likely need scanning at our [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership in [resource_dealer_address type=city].

    Anti-lock Brakes

    An issue with the ABS has triggered the computer and requires a [resource_dealer_name] technician’s diagnostic.

    Gas Cap

    Your vehicle’s gas cap is not attached properly. This may also trigger your check engine light.

    Cruise Control

    Indicates your vehicle’s cruise control is engaged.

    ESP Fault

    There are issues with your electronic stability system or traction control. Contact a trusted technician at our dealership near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4].

    Security

    Your ignition switch is locked and your alarm code will need to be entered to reengage it. If this indicator displays while your vehicle is running, there is a problem with your security system.

    Headlight/Taillight Out

    An exterior light on your vehicle is not fully working or has gone out.

    Traction Control/ESP

    Indicates that traction control is enabled, often lights up on slick roads.

    Door Ajar

    A door or the vehicle’s trunk or hood is not fully shut.

    Overdrive/Sport

    Your vehicle’s performance mode is engaged.

    Airbag Warning

    If indicator remains on, a possible airbag malfunction has been detected and logged by your vehicle’s computer. Seek the help of a professional at [resource_dealer_name] near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1].

    Wiper Fluid

    Your wiper fluid is low. Check all storage tanks as per your owner’s manual and refill as needed. Doing this proactively keeps you safer on the road in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] .

    Glow Plug (Diesel)

    Your engine’s glow plugs are engaged and heating. Do not start the engine until this indicator is off.

    Exhaust Particulate Filter (Diesel)

    There is an issue with your exhaust filter that requires service at [resource_dealer_name].

    Exhaust Fluid (Diesel)

    Your diesel exhaust fluid levels are low. Locate and refill your reservoir as per your owner’s manual


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => Decode Your Dashboard [post_excerpt] => A guide to common dashboard indicator lights. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => decode-your-dashboard [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/decode-your-dashboard/ [menu_order] => 22 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937490 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => What Do I Do If My Air Conditioning Isn't Cold?

    What Do I Do If My Air Conditioning Isn't Cold?


    What Do I Do If My Air Conditioning Isn't Cold?

    Baking in your car because you forgot to check your air conditioning system before the first hot day of the year in [resource_dealer_address type=state] isn't a great feeling. With a few easy steps, you can check for yourself if you just need to add some fluid to your system, or whether there could be a more serious problem at hand.

    Remember, if your car has been sitting in the heat for several hours while you are shopping in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], then heat has stored up in the car and has to leave before it starts to feel cool. However, if a few minutes pass and it isn't feeling any better, then there could be a problem. There are several reasons your air conditioning system might be blowing warm air instead of cool air.

    Here are a few possibilities:

    1. A Refrigerant Leak

    The leak may be in the evaporator, condenser, or hose, in which case you should bring your car to a mechanic at [resource_dealer_name] to be repaired. The chemical that cools the air is called Freon, and because an air conditioning system is sensitive, the amount of Freon needs to be precise for it to work correctly. If the air still isn't cold after adding more Freon then there is probably another leak in the system. This is one of the most common issues for air conditioning problems.

    2. A Bad Compressor

    The compressor pressurizes the refrigerant and pumps it throughout the A/C's necessary components. Because everything revolves around the compressor, a faulty compressor means that the air conditioning will not work correctly. There will usually be a loud noise when you attempt to turn on your air conditioner if the compressor is broken while in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2].

    3. A Clogged Orifice Tube

    The orifice tube is located between the condenser in the front of the radiator and the evaporator in the passenger compartment. If there is an obstruction in the tube, it will stop the refrigerant from reaching the evaporator, causing your system to blow warm air. If left unrepaired, this will only get worse as time goes on. Getting it checked immediately at [resource_dealer_name] is the right way to go. No one wants to be driving from [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] in a warm car.

    4. Lost Charge

    A very common cause of an air conditioner not being cold is that the refrigerant needs to be recharged. You can charge it yourself with a charger kit, but you may be more comfortable bringing it to our shop in [resource_dealer_address type=city] for an easy fix.

    5. Damaged Fan

    You can recognize this symptom if you can feel cold air but it is not actually blowing. If it's a faulty cable, you can fix it by taking apart the dashboard. However, it might require a new fan unit altogether.

    6. Blend Air Door is jammed

    Your vehicle's ventilation system houses a small hatch called the blend air door that draws in cold air when you change the system in your car from heat to chill. If this change doesn't happen, it could mean that it is still drawing heat from the engine instead. This could be complicated to fix, so take it to a trusted mechanic near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] if you're inexperienced.

    8. Dirt Inside the System

    Refrigerant, chemicals, and oil should be the only substances in your system. If dirt enters, it can cause the expansion valve to fail, the refrigerant to decompose, the compressor bearings to seize, and the metal parts to corrode.

    9. Moisture in the Air Conditioning System

    Moisture can cause oxides and acids to form, which can be a serious problem to your air conditioning system. Moisture can also freeze your expansion valves and lead to air conditioner failure.


    The air conditioning system in a car is complicated and sensitive. Some issues can be easy to fix, like just adding some more Freon. However, some issues should only be handled by a trained and certified mechanic at [resource_dealer_name]. They have the proper equipment to inspect the system, repair leaks, and fix the Freon levels to be the right pressure for your specific vehicle and compressor. Although seeing an expert will cost money in labor, it is worth it to have peace of mind and know that the job is being done right for your car.

    We'd be happy to assist you with a broken air conditioner. Schedule a service appointment here or call [resource_dealer_phone type=service] , and one of our experienced technicians will assist you in diagnosing or fixing the problem.




    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => What Do I Do If My Air Conditioning Isn't Cold? [post_excerpt] => Baking in your car isn't a great feeling. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-do-i-do-if-my-air-conditioning-isnt-cold [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/what-do-i-do-if-my-air-conditioning-isnt-cold/ [menu_order] => 23 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937483 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => The Effects of Recalls on Used Car Buyers in [resource_dealer_address type=city]

    The Effects of Recalls on Used Car Buyers in [resource_dealer_address type=city]


    How used car shoppers near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] can avoid purchasing a recalled vehicle

    Vehicle recalls in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] can consist of any type of defect. From a minor inconvenience to a major issue, the thought of purchasing—or having just purchased—a vehicle that may have a defect can be stressful.

    Fortunately, under federal law, new cars at [resource_dealer_name] can be sold only if all pending recalls have been performed. With used cars, sellers aren’t required to adhere to the same law. Used car dealerships and private sellers in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] can technically sell vehicles with outstanding recalls to buyers.

    Certified pre-owned and NADA

    There are a few measures in place to help protect buyers from purchasing a car with an outstanding recall.

    In order for a manufacturer-backed pre-owned vehicle to become certified, it must pass a rigorous inspection that includes being up to date on any open recalls. Additionally, the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) advises its members to frequently check their inventory for vehicles that have been recalled and to perform the work before selling.


    But what if you’re buying from a private seller or a used car lot?

    There is no law or regulation formally protecting buyers from purchasing a used vehicle with an outstanding recall in [resource_dealer_address type=city]. The burden ultimately falls on consumers to protect themselves from purchasing a vehicle that might have a defect or be unsafe to drive.

    Protecting yourself from purchasing a recalled vehicle

    1. Check for recalls on the vehicle you’re interested in purchasing. A good place to start is [resource_toggle_verbiage us="the Consumer Reports Recall Database" ca="Transport Canada’s Motor Vehicle Safety Recalls Database"].
    2. The manufacturer’s or dealer’s website is also a good place to look for open recalls.
    3. Work with the seller to get the recall taken care of before purchasing the vehicle.
    4. Look up the car on CarFax – they offer a free recall check service that will tell you the recall status of the vehicle you’re looking to purchase.
    5. As a last resort, make an appointment with [resource_dealer_name] immediately following the purchase to have it taken care of before you start to rely on the vehicle for transportation.
    6. If you’ve already purchased a vehicle that has an open recall, give [resource_dealer_name] a call and they will be able to set you up with an appointment to have it serviced free of charge. Be prepared with the vehicles VIN, make, model and year.

    The best way to avoid purchasing a vehicle in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] that has an outstanding recall is to visit a trusted dealership that sells new vehicles from the manufacturer of the used vehicle you’re looking to buy. The dealership would have little to gain from being furtive with recall information, since they would be responsible for its repair. If you can’t avoid buying from a private seller, be sure to research before purchasing. The more you know about the manufacturer and the vehicle itself, the better your chances of being unaffected by a recall.



    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => The Effects of Recalls on Used Car Buyers [post_excerpt] => How used car shoppers can avoid purchasing a recalled vehicle. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-effects-of-recalls-on-used-car-buyers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/the-effects-of-recalls-on-used-car-buyers/ [menu_order] => 24 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937484 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    How Long Do Transmissions Last In [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?


    Ideally, transmissions in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] should last the life of a car, but many times will fail before their time. The life of a transmission can be one of the biggest concerns for new car buyers near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] because they are expensive to replace and it can be difficult to predict their lifespan. Transmission lifespans are determined on a case-by-case basis at [resource_dealer_name], and are the result of different contributing factors. Some transmissions can last just over [resource_toggle_verbiage us="100,000 miles" ca="150,000 km"], while others will last over [resource_toggle_verbiage us="200,000 miles" ca="300,000 km"] in [resource_dealer_address type=state]. Generally though, regular vehicle maintenance is the number one factor effecting a transmission’s lifespan, and good upkeep can help it last even longer.

    The transmission in [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] cars, and indeed all makes is linked to other parts of the car like the chassis, engine, electronic systems, and differentials. Problems in the transmission will lead to problems with these other parts of the car and vice versa, which is why it’s so important to keep your transmission healthy and help prolong it’s life as much as possible. While it’s almost impossible for anyone around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] to come up with a definite answer on how long a specific car’s transmission will last, regular maintenance at [resource_dealer_name] and attention are two important factors that can help you prolong the life of your transmission while in or near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4].

    1. Lubrication/Fluids & Heat

    Transmissions are designed for specific purposes and tolerances, and work with specific types of fluids. Not all fluids are equal and right for every transmission. There are over fifty different types and grades of fluid on the market today in and around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]. Each type and grade provides a different amount of slip for your vehicle. Slip affects the amount of heat generated to your transmission; meaning fluid has a big influence on heat and pressure placed on your transmission. The more heat placed on a transmission the shorter their lifespans become. Heat causes fluid to fail, components to break down, and for the car’s lifespan to drop fast while in [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4]. Keep your transmission fluid at the right level and change it often enough at [resource_dealer_name], so that the parts don’t grind together and damage the transmission.

    2. Driving Habits In [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    People living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] understand driving habits have a large impact on their transmission’s longevity. Accelerating quickly and hard brakes increase the chances of your transmission wearing out before its time, so avoid these habits for the sake of your vehicle and transmission. Like most parts of a vehicle, excessive miles can also cause transmissions to fail before their time. Like most of these factors, it can depend on your type of vehicle as well. Some car manufacturers have reputations for having durable transmissions and may be able to handle more wear.

    Transmissions are one of the most expensive components of a car to replace and repair in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], or really anywhere. In an ideal world, transmissions would survive for the duration of the car’s life, but there are many factors that will influence the transmission’s actual lifespan. The maintenance and service done to the transmission and the style of driving are more important factors. Aggressive driving, such as hard and sudden braking and accelerating quickly, all wear down the transmission. Take it upon yourself to keep up regular maintenance for your transmission and for the sake of your car, and wallet while in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => How Long Do Transmissions Last? [post_excerpt] => The life of a transmission can be one of the biggest concerns for a car buyer. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-long-do-transmissions-last [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/how-long-do-transmissions-last/ [menu_order] => 25 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937486 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    I Live in [resource_dealer_address type=state] near [resource_dealer_address type=city], How Long Will My Engine Last?


    [resource_toggle_verbiage us="200,000 is the New 100,000" ca="300,000 is the New 150,000"]

    Most of the cars released within the past several years, including [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] vehicles, are built to last [resource_toggle_verbiage us="250,000 miles" ca="400,000 km"] or more with simple routine maintenance. Vehicles have come a long way – historically, odometers have only advanced to [resource_toggle_verbiage us="99,999 miles" ca="99,999"] before zeroing out.

    According to R.L. Polk (IHS Automotive) the average lifetime of modern cars is trending up. In 2009, the average lifetime of a vehicle on the road was 9.4 years. In 2013 that number increased to 10.8 years and again in 2015 to 11.4 years. Engineering standards for automotive engines have vastly increased within the past 15 years, which has done much to prolong the useful life of an engine.

    How long will my engine last?

    The answer is both simple and complicated: It comes down to parts. An engine is made up of several intricate parts that need to be functioning in high order to ensure longevity driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], [resource_dealer_address type=state]!

    Some parts on your car are made to wear and be replaced (tires, brake pads, rotors, etc.). The engine and its parts are made to last the life of your vehicle. If parts of an engine fail, they will need to be replaced or you risk damaging the engine beyond repair.

    Replacing engine parts typically isn’t cheap near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and they aren’t easy to fix, either. In most cases at [resource_dealer_name], engine trouble leads to a driver to seriously consider purchasing a new vehicle. The decision comes down to economic value of a vehicle and it’s useful life.

    So, how long will your car last in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]? If you purchase a vehicle with a good engine, then it’s really up to you.

    Influencing Factors on Automotive Engine Lifetime around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    1. What’s it made of?

    Everyone knows that engines are made of metal, but the type of metal determines durability. Engines are commonly made of aluminum, iron, or a combination of aluminum and iron.

    Iron tends to be more durable because it can withstand higher temperatures better over time. Aluminum is substantially lighter, and is often used in parts like the headers, while iron is more commonly found in the engine block.

    2. Driving Habits through [resource_dealer_address type=city]

    The degree to which your engine has to work greatly influences lifetime. Rapid acceleration or deceleration around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], redlining RPMs and towing heavy loads around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_address type=city] can put excessive stress on an engine, shortening its lifespan.

    3. Advancements in Technology

    [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] engines produced now in [resource_dealer_address type=country] have higher common standards than ever before. They are rigorously tested, built with better materials and have more innovative designs than ever before. These advancements are the result of [resource_toggle_verbiage us="the EPA" ca="Environment Canada"] and similar regulatory forces around the world setting higher emissions standards.

    New standards lead to increased efficiency, reduced emissions and less wear.

    4. Maintenance

    Much like driving habits, this factor is entirely dependent on you, the vehicle owner. Stay up to date on routine [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] maintenance for fluids and filters, and be aware of the systems that your engine depends on. Keep an eye on oil and ensure your oil pressure sensor is working.

    The engine also works in tandem with other car systems, including exhaust, cooling, transmission and electrical systems. If these systems aren’t functioning properly while driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], the engine may have to pick up the slack, reducing its effectiveness over a long lifespan in [resource_dealer_address type=state].

    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.



    [post_title] => How Long Will Your Engine Last? [post_excerpt] => 200,000 is the New 100,000. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => how-long-will-your-engine-last [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/how-long-will-your-engine-last/ [menu_order] => 26 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937487 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    [resource_title]


    If you’re a car owner in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], sooner or later you’ll be forced to make the choice

    Should I Repair or Replace My Old Car?

    The decision can be difficult; there are pros and cons to both keeping and replacing your old vehicle. [resource_dealer_name] wants to help you make your decision. Think of it in terms of practicality, math, and intuition. Your decision should make sense financially and personally.

    If you’re wondering if you should replace or repair your car, ask yourself the following questions:

    Do your repairs cost more than the car is worth?

    This can be determined with some research and simple math. Calculate the value of your vehicle around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] using online tools such as [resource_toggle_verbiage us="Kelley Blue Book, Black Book," ca="Black Book,"] or a value your trade tool, like the one we offer here. If repairs total more than your vehicle is worth, you may want to replace the vehicle.

    Will future repairs cost more than the vehicle is worth around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?

    Like current repairs, you also need to think about what future repairs your vehicle might need. If you’re driving from [resource_dealer_address type=city] to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] thinking you’ll need new brakes in a few months, it might be in your best interest to trade in your vehicle for a newer one.

    Can you afford a monthly payment?

    If your car is old enough that you no longer have a payment, determine if it makes financial sense to pick up a car payment. If your repairs only total a few hundred dollars once or twice a year in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], it’s going to be far less expensive to repair than to replace.

    Is your current car reliable?

    Your safety should be your number one priority when driving any vehicle. If you’re apprehensive about your car breaking down as you’re driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], you should replace it immediately.

    How has your lifestyle changed since you last purchased a car?

    At [resource_dealer_name] we know sometimes big life changes can cause our vehicles to no longer meet our needs. Maybe you’ve started a family near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and could use some extra space in the back seat. Perhaps you’ve moved from [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], doubling or tripling your commute time, making your gas-guzzling pickup impractical. Whatever your lifestyle change, a new car may meet your needs better than your current vehicle.

    Can you afford a down payment?

    Sometimes, you can get away with minimal or no down payment—especially during special events or [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] incentives at [resource_dealer_name]. However, most of the time, you’re going to have to put as much as 20% down. If you just can’t swing the down payment right now, it might make more sense to keep your car and save up until you can afford it.

    What will your new insurance costs be?

    In [resource_dealer_address type=state], sometimes changing your vehicle can change the cost of your insurance. It’s worth looking into and calculating what your new payment would be before committing to a new vehicle.


    By asking yourself the above questions, you can gain some insight into whether you should repair your current vehicle or get a new one altogether. People living near [resource_dealer_address type=city] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] can reach a trusted mechanic to get an honest assessment of the cost of repairs on your vehicle at [resource_dealer_name], schedule a service appointment here or call [resource_dealer_phone type=service] .

    If you’re looking to replace your car, value your trade here and call [resource_dealer_phone type=toll] to make an appointment with a [resource_dealer_name] sales representative who can get you into a new ride today.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => Should I Repair or Replace My Old Car? [post_excerpt] => If you’re a car owner, sooner or later you’ll be forced to make the choice. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => should-i-repair-or-replace-my-old-car [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/should-i-repair-or-replace-my-old-car/ [menu_order] => 27 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937488 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => The "Shift" from Manual to Automatic Transmission

    The "Shift" from Manual to Automatic Transmission


    Could we be witnessing the death of the stick shift in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?

    The “Shift” from Manual to Automatic Transmission

    The fact is, manual transmissions once had their perks, but they just aren’t practical anymore for drivers near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].

    In 2013, only 4% of cars sold had manual transmissions. On top of that, 67% of new models sold don’t even come with a manual option. Some popular sports car manufacturers, including Porsche, Lamborghini, Jaguar, and Ferrari are abandoning manual transmissions in favor of high performance automatic versions

    Death of the manual transmission?

    So what are the factors contributing to the decline of the stick shift in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]?

    Learning Curve

    Driving stick is often perceived to be “more fun” than driving automatic, but it also requires additional skill beyond knowing the rules of the road. In essence, the car needs you to drive, and if you don’t shift and clutch properly you can do serious damage to your vehicle from [resource_dealer_name].

    Automatic transmissions take proper shifting, acceleration, and deceleration out of the mix, lowering the involvement of the driver. As driving safely around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] already demands a lot of attention, the proposition of taking additional stress out of the equation is attractive to many [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] drivers.

    Traffic

    Since the end of the '90s, most cities have seen an influx in population. With that number expected to grow, traffic has become more congested and intense. This traffic stems not only from additional cars, but also from pedestrians, bicyclists, etc.

    Drivers in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] need to be more vigilant and automatic transmissions allow for that. Unfortunately, with less driver involvement and increasingly more distractions, this isn’t always the case. However, that responsibility falls pretty squarely on the driver, not the transmission.

    Technology and Cost

    When automatic transmissions were first introduced, they couldn’t handle the gear ratios as effectively as a skilled stick driver and the technology was expensive. This led to cars with manual transmissions being less expensive and more fuel-efficient than cars with automatic transmissions.

    In and around [resource_dealer_address type=city] over the years, automatic transmission technology has improved to the point where some models get the same or better gas mileage than manual transmissions in the same model. In addition to this, new transmission technology like dual clutch or continuous variable (CVT) promise even more efficiency in perfecting gear ratios.

    While this new tech has only penetrated about 10% of the market, you can expect it to be commonplace within a few years, according to the Washington Post.

    No Longer a “Theft Deterrent”

    Perhaps, at one point, manual transmissions were somewhat of a “theft deterrent” against criminals who broke in only to find that they couldn’t physically drive the car.

    The fact is that whether you drive in [resource_dealer_address type=state] or else where, or whether you like automatic or manual transmissions, this argument is now moot. When you factor in the complex security systems in many cars on the road today near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], it’s reasonable to assume that any thief will have the intelligence level to have at least thought that far ahead.

    Heroes Get Remembered, But Legends Never Die

    Whether the stick shift will go extinct one day or not, we can’t say for sure. There will always be the select few who are adamant about driving stick-shift sport cars that will always be released with manual-only transmissions.

    There is something freeing about driving on a country road near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], opening up the gears with the wind in your hair. That’s something everyone should enjoy at least once. As for everyday life, however, it seems that stick shifts are just not that practical anymore.

    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => The "Shift" from Manual to Automatic Transmission [post_excerpt] => Could we be witnessing the death of the stick shift? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-shift-from-manual-to-automatic-transmission [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/the-shift-from-manual-to-automatic-transmission/ [menu_order] => 28 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937489 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content] => What Do Extended Warranties Cover?

    What Do Extended Warranties Cover?


    What Do Extended Warranties Cover?

    An extended warranty is an insurance policy on your car -- a safeguard against unforeseen repairs. You can purchase an extended warranty in addition to the manufacturer’s standard warranty at [resource_dealer_name] to receive coverage for things like the exhaust, engine, air conditioning, heating, electrical systems, and regular usage wear. For [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] drivers near [resource_dealer_address type=city], depending on the terms, many plans will also cover oil changes, brake pads, and filters. When you think about how often you change all of these, you can see where the value comes in! (And if you aren’t changing these often, you’re probably making at least one of the 10 Serious Mistakes in Car Maintenance.

    An extended warranty may be purchased when you buy your vehicle in [resource_dealer_address type=city] or at a later date, but purchasing the warranty earlier will give you better coverage in the long run. For drivers in and around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] if you're the type of person who likes to be ready for all possibilities, an extended warranty may be just what you're looking for. Some plans may also include roadside assistance, which is a great peace of mind on the road for drivers near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]. With the ever-increasing cost of vehicle repairs, an extended warranty can be extremely valuable.

    In deciding whether an extended warranty is right for you, you'll need to consider a few things:

    • To what extent is your vehicle already under warranty in [resource_dealer_address type=state]? Do you plan to keep the vehicle past this period?
    • How reliable is your vehicle make and model? Is this car known for being high maintenance?
    • Is the extended warranty from the factory, the dealer, or a third party provider? While aftermarket warranties are cheaper, they may not hold the same value.
    • There are differences in deductible; you can pay per visit or per repair at [resource_dealer_name]. Be sure you understand the difference before you buy at our [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership.
    • Some extended warranties are transferable should you decide to sell the car before the end of your contract. This can help to increase the value of your sale. For more information from [resource_dealer_name] on increasing value of your trade, download our FREE checklist here.
    • What exactly is covered? Does your warranty cover breakdown as well as wear and tear from driving around the [resource_dealer_address type=city] area?

    Do you drive frequently around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]? Under a "breakdown" warranty, coverage is extended only to parts that break. Additionally, some "entry-level" contracts don't cover ABS brakes, so if your vehicle has this feature, you should consider upgrading your warranty. Overheating, regardless of its cause, isn't covered in many warranties. Thus, if overheating occurs due to problems with an expensive part such as the radiator, you'll be stuck with a hefty repair bill.

    Every warranty is different, just as every [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] owner is different. Before committing to a warranty, take the time to fully explore the ins and outs of its coverage implications and make sure they align with what will keep you feeling safe and comfortable in your car. The distinctions between the various plans might seem slight, but they can prove important in the event of an emergency for drivers in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4].




    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => What Do Extended Warranties Cover? [post_excerpt] => An extended warranty is like an insurance policy on your car. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => what-do-extended-warranties-cover [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/what-do-extended-warranties-cover/ [menu_order] => 29 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937472 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    7 Little Known Ways To Increase Fuel Efficiency Around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    We’ve all heard the common fuel efficiency suggestions: “Drive less, plan trips, don’t speed, don’t throttle…”

    With our busy, unpredictable lives, it can be difficult to always adhere to these practices. The good news is that there are some little known ways to increase fuel efficiency when driving from [resource_dealer_address type=city] to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], or from [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3]. Many of them are actually quite obvious and easy to implement without drastically changing your driving practices.

    1. Maintain good tire practices.

    Tires are more than just inflated pieces of rubber that roll your car down the streets of [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3]. They are scientifically designed to reduce wear and increase vehicle performance. In order to do this, they must be properly inflated. Improper inflation will reduce fuel efficiency by up to 3%.

    3% may not seem like much, but this number can compound quickly when combined with additional inefficiencies within the vehicle.

    In addition to proper inflation, you might consider narrower tires, which are more aerodynamic and therefore provide better fuel economy. Always consult an expert at [resource_dealer_name] before making the switch to ensure new tires will provide enough traction and fit wheels properly in your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes], or any vehicle.

    2. Keep your windows up on the highway.

    It can be fun to turn up the music, roll your windows down, and feel the wind in your hair on the highway driving from [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] towards [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4]. However, this practice can cost you big at the pump. Highway driving with your windows down can reduce fuel efficiency by 10%.

    There is good news, though. The aerodynamic effect of open windows is negligible with city driving, so feel free to enjoy the breeze when you’re driving up to [resource_toggle_verbiage us="40 MPH" ca="65 KPH"] around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]!

    3. Use air conditioning sparingly.

    Continuing on from the last point, it may be better to utilize outside airflow for city driving. Using AC always weighs on your engine, but the effect is far more pronounced with the stop/start nature of city driving. So roll your windows down and enjoy the breeze as you cruise through [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2].

    4. Change your engine air filters.

    At the most basic level, engines run on a mixture of air and fuel. Without enough air, an engine won’t run or, if it does, it will consume too much fuel.

    Always keep an eye on the quality of your engine air filter after driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city]. To learn more, click here. A dirty or clogged air filter reduces airflow to the engine, requiring it to work harder and consume more fuel.

    5. Lighten your load.

    This may seem like a simple concept, but it can easily slip your mind. The heavier your car is, the harder it will need to work to move total mass around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3]. In fact, for every [resource_toggle_verbiage us="100 lbs" ca="45 kg"] added you will increase fuel consumption by 1-2%!

    6. Don’t ignore faulty sensors.

    Your car is full of sensors that you may not even be aware of. Sensors are strategically placed to monitor vehicle performance and make you aware of anything that could potentially threaten efficiency.

    Often when these sensors become faulty or damaged, we put off replacing them. It’s easy to justify because they aren’t essential to the basic function of a vehicle. However, by ignoring these sensors, you’ll miss out on important feedback from your car on its operation. Many of these sensors provide data that impacts fuel economy. Some common sensors are:

    • Tire pressure
    • Oxygen level
    • Engine emissions
    • Evaporative emissions

    A damaged oxygen sensor alone in a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] could decrease fuel efficiency by 20% or more!

    7. Use proper fueling practices.

    When you’re at the pump in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], common sense might have you use a higher-octane fuel because of its “higher quality.” However, you might be surprised to find that if your car only requires 87% octane fuel (the lowest level available at most pumps), using 89% or 91% won’t increase fuel efficiency. It will simply cost more and provide no added benefit to engine performance.

    When you’re fueling up your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes], go to a brand name station. You might save a few cents here and there at discount stations around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state], but lower quality fuel gives you worse [resource_toggle_verbiage us="MPG" ca="KM/L"] and increases wear on your engine over time.

    Finally, keep your tank above ¼ full. When your tank gets low the fuel pump has to work harder, decreasing fuel efficiency in your car.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => 7 Little Known Ways To Increase Fuel Efficiency [post_excerpt] => Easy to implement without drastically changing your driving practices. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 7-little-known-ways-to-increase-fuel-efficiency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/7-little-known-ways-to-increase-fuel-efficiency/ [menu_order] => 30 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937473 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    [resource_title] for everyone in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    10 Clever Car Cleaning and Organizing Tips from [resource_dealer_name]

    The average [resource_toggle_verbiage us="American drives 13,476 miles" ca="Canadian drives 20,000 km"] per year, which equates to a lot of time spent in the car around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]. For individuals who commute around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], the time spent in the car can be even higher — and it only increases for those who have kids.

    With all the time [resource_toggle_verbiage us="Americans" ca="Canadians"] spend in the car, vehicles can get dirty pretty fast. Whether it’s crumbs in the seat from a road trip around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], sticky spilled coffee in the cup holder or toys accumulated in the backseat from entertaining kids, [resource_dealer_name] knows most people have faced a mess in the car at one point or another. The problem is, cleaning out a car can be a hassle. Detail cleaning can seem daunting with air vents and lots of small spaces for messes to hide—but it doesn’t have to be so bad.

    [resource_dealer_name] offers ten tips for cleaning and organizing your car:

    1. Rubbing Alcohol

    If your wiper blades are smearing water rather than removing it, take a clean cloth with some rubbing alcohol and gently run it against the rubber that makes contact with the windshield. It will get your wipers back to normal.

    2. Toothbrush

    Use an old toothbrush for detail cleaning. It can reach into all the nooks and crannies of your vehicle and can be used wet with soap or dry to bring up dirt and dust.

    3. Spray Bottle & Squeegee

    Use a spray bottle and squeegee to remove stubborn pet hair on your cloth seats. Start by lightly spraying water on your seats and drag the squeegee across them to gather pet hair at the base of the seat.


    Schedule an appointment with [resource_dealer_name] today. We're located near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    4. Cupcake Liner

    Use a silicone cupcake liner in your cup holders. It will protect against unwanted dust, debris and liquids.

    5. WD-40

    Remove any old bumper stickers by lightly spraying them with WD-40.

    6. Toothpaste

    Driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] can lead to dirty headlights. If you have dirty headlights, put some toothpaste on a microfiber cloth to buff them clean and rinse thoroughly with water. They will be crystal clear and increase your visibility.

    7. Compressed Air

    Use compressed air to blast dust and debris from your air vents and use a foam arts and crafts sponge to remove anything that’s still stuck inside.

    8. Plastic Bags

    Travel with plastic bags for any trash, wet clothes or dirty shoes by keeping them stashed in an empty tissue box.

    9. Plastic Shower Caddy

    Use a plastic shower caddy to organize items you want to travel with like toiletries, cosmetics, or a roadside emergency kit. It will keep everything neatly stashed in a console, the trunk, between two seats, or on the floor.

    10. Remote Control Caddy

    Use a remote control caddy, typically used on a bed or reclining armchair, in the car. It can help keep your umbrella, extra tissues, plastic bags, and other travel items organized and off the floor.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    [resource_title] Found Around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], and [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    10 Most Common Vehicle Defects found around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    When it comes to the functionality of your vehicle, it's always better to be safe than sorry. You might think that you're only experiencing a small issue while driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and that it's okay to wait until the problem gets worse. However, even the smallest components of your car can have serious consequences if it fails. When checking to make sure your car is functioning properly, there are a number of things you should look at to make sure your safety is your first priority. [resource_dealer_name] offers the top 10 most common vehicle defects you should check for.

    1. Seatbelts

    The seatbelt is perhaps the most important innovation in automotive safety over the past 50 years. When you get in a car around [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], the first thing you (hopefully) do is put on your seatbelt. They are the main restraint in a car, which means that there can be serious consequences when they don't work how they're supposed to. Defects in seatbelts could mean anything from a broken latch to malfunctioning tension detectors. When any part of the seatbelt fails, it can put the lives of you and those around you at risk. [resource_toggle_verbiage us="However, these injuries can be easily avoided just by having functioning seatbelts. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, around 3 million people are injured from seatbelt failure every year" ca="However, these injuries can be easily avoided just by having functioning seatbelts"]. Make sure you're not one of them by staying up to date with current recalls with [resource_dealer_name]'s free tool.

    2. Airbags

    Defective airbags can mean a variety of things, the most severe of which is an airbag that fails to deploy at all. Airbags are what can prevent you from a life threatening injury in the event that you are in an accident around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], so it's crucial that they are working properly. On the other hand, airbags can also deploy when they are not supposed to, which can cause another set of problems. The impact of an airbag deploying can cause unnecessary bruises and burns. It can also distract and blind you while driving, which might cause an actual accident! You would most likely have to replace the airbag after the unnecessary deployment as well. A third sign of a defect is if your airbags deploy too quickly or with too much force. This could cause separate injuries in addition to the impact of a car accident.

    3. Door Latch Mechanisms

    In September of 2014, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began an investigation into door latch failures. The most common failure is with the pawl spring, a coil-shaped object that brings a door handle back to its closed position. If not looked into, broken pawl springs can have very dangerous consequences. For example, if a person closes the door with too much force, the latch could snap and cause the door to bounce back and hit the person. Or, if a passenger is leaning against a door from the inside while the car is in motion, the door could swing open and launch the passenger from the moving vehicle.

    4. Fuel Pump

    The fuel pump is crucial to any vehicle, as it is what propels fuel from a vehicle's tank to its engine. A faulty pump could lead to a non-starting car. If an engine sputters too quickly, it could mean that the fuel pump is defective; the pump could be struggling to give a constant stream of fuel to the engine at a consistent pressure. This would cause the engine to sputter quickly. If your vehicle loses power while you're accelerating, this could also be a sign of a faulty fuel pump. It will feel as though your car is stalling before it returns to normal while you try to accelerate from a stop. Keeping an eye on your fuel pump and recognizing the above signs could help you prevent having a car that won't start.

    5. Steering Components

    Make sure you have your equipment and car components checked before you purchase a vehicle near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], and at regular intervals afterwards as well. If a steering component goes haywire, it can cause a major accident that no amount of driver experience can control.

    6. Braking Systems

    This is one of the most common defects in a vehicle, as it can lead to deadly car accidents. Look for dual brake systems supported by modern [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] models, which reduce the risk of brakes failing. With a dual brake system, when one circuit fails, the other is able to take its place and allow the car to brake safely.

    7. Windows

    Car windows should not have any holes or even hairline cracks. They should be smooth and able to go up and down easily. Windows should also fit snugly against the rubber stoppers on the door.

    8. Tires

    If you're buying a used vehicle near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state], make sure to check the tire pressure beforehand; under-inflated or worn out tires are some major causes of car accidents. Defective suspensions and misaligned suspensions can also lead to uneven tires. This can cause uneven wear and an eventual blowout that can then cause an accident.

    9. Windshield Wipers

    It's easy to tell when your windshield wipers aren't working properly - you can usually see that the wiper has not swept completely over where the brush passed. Not having effective wipers can reduce visibility and could cause an accident during rain or snow. If you notice your wiper blades aren't working to full capacity, swap them out for new ones before they get even worse.

    10. Headlights and Taillights

    A large percentage of all car accidents around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] happen at night. Low visibility can cause drivers to lose sight of the road and can lead to some serious incidents. Make sure your headlights and taillights are both working correctly and effectively before it’s too late.


    If you need someone to help you figure out what's wrong with your vehicle, book an appointment for service with us at [resource_dealer_name] or call [resource_dealer_phone type=service] to speak with an experienced mechanic.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    10 Serious Mistakes in Car Maintenance around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    While you might be tempted to bring your car in for service around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] every time something seems off, some things are easier to check on your own. However in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] [resource_dealer_address type=state], if you’re going to commit to DIY maintenance, you also need to remember to check the small things you might overlook. Here are 10 tips from [resource_dealer_name] to help prevent you from making mistakes that might jeopardize the smooth operation of your [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] vehicle.

    1. Change your oil in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state].

    At [resource_dealer_name] we suggest you use the manufacturer's recommended maintenance schedule to figure out how often you need to change your oil. Every car is different and the old [resource_toggle_verbiage us="3,000-mile" ca="5,000 km"] rule is outdated. Not keeping up with your manufacturer’s recommended oil changes could cause permanent damage to your engine -- and replacing an engine could cost you thousands of dollars! Ignoring your oil change can also nullify your warranty; many manufacturers now include oil change requirements in their warranties. If you do not keep up with their recommendations, your warranty will be invalidated. On average for people living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], oil changes [resource_toggle_verbiage us="cost less than $25" ca="cost around $50"] - a worthwhile price to save thousands on an engine replacement!

    2. Don’t neglect coolant, brake fluid, and transmission fluid service.

    The best rule of thumb around [resource_dealer_address type=city] is to make sure your coolant and brake fluid levels are always between the minimum and maximum lines. First, make sure you get the right coolant for your engine type. Although many coolant companies now make their fluid safe for most cars, you should still consult your owner’s manual to be sure. You should also consult your manual for information on brake fluid and transmission fluid recommendations. Around [resource_dealer_address type=city] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], [resource_dealer_address type=state] transmission repairs are one of the most expensive repairs, and not changing your fluid could mean replacing your transmission soon.

    3. Check your tire pressure frequently.

    You should check your tire pressure approximately once a month if you live around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4]. You can buy a decent pressure gauge for less than $20. Low, under-inflated tires cause the car to take longer to come to a stop in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]. They are also bad in emergency situations because they give you less control over your vehicle. In [resource_dealer_address type=state] having excessively low or high tire pressure could cause a blowout and risk your safety, as well as the safety of those driving around you. Having the right pressure can extend the life of your tires; that means fewer replacements and money saved!

    4. Lubricate your door and trunk hinges.

    Your door and trunk hinges will need lubrication to stay in shape. Check to make sure everything is greased at least once a year. If they begin to squeak, it’s time for grease. Not only will dry hinges drive you crazy with their squeaking, they can also bend and bind after a while, and your car doors can get off center. Keep your car feeling like new and lubricate your hinges before driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city].

    5. Driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1]? Don’t ignore strange noises.

    This includes tapping, whistling, popping, or anything else that is out of the norm for your car. At [resource_dealer_name] we've found that these could be signs of deeper issues at hand and can vary in severity depending on where the sound is coming from. Take note of when you hear these noises and what circumstances might have caused them. A strange noise could indicate a defective part or even loose bolts. When in doubt, get it checked! Come visit our service department at [resource_dealer_name] -- we'd be glad to help you.

    6. Don’t ignore your ‘check engine’ light.

    This could be one of the most expensive mistakes you make. You may be used to leaving the light on for months at a time while driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and while it might seem harmless at first, whatever problem your engine is having could have a snowball effect that causes other, more expensive problems. This could even hinder your safety later on. For example, in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] one of the most common reasons for a check engine light is a damaged spark plug. You can replace your own spark plug for less than $15, but ignoring it can result in costs of over $1,000 if something like a new catalytic converter is required.

    Click here for more information on why your engine light could be on.

    7. Change your engine air and fuel filters in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].

    At [resource_dealer_name] we suggest you check your filters every 6 months. Like your engine light, engine air filters can become exponentially more expensive the longer you neglect them. Not replacing your engine air filter can cause damage to your oxygen sensor, and repairing it can cost as much as $250 for people living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1]! Further neglect of the filter can cause the catalytic converter to fail. These can cost $1,000 or more to replace. Replacing filters on [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] vehicles is an inexpensive way to keep your car maintained and your wallet happy.

    8. Don’t ignore [resource_dealer_address type=state] safety recalls.

    Safety recalls can be ordered by government safety agencies or by manufacturers themselves. You might be tempted to ignore a recall if you haven’t experienced any issues with your vehicle, but that doesn’t mean you won’t see more serious and expensive problems down the line. Plus, oftentimes a manufacturer will upfront the cost to repair the problem, which is even more of an incentive to get the problem fixed.

    Click here to see if your car has been recalled with our FREE Recall Check Tool.

    9. Don’t let unqualified mechanics and shops service your car.

    While this can sometimes work in your favor, it is a high risk, low reward strategy. Manufacturer qualified mechanics can give you peace of mind and better adhere to your warranty standards. Don’t risk the life of your car with an unqualified or inexperienced mechanic. [resource_dealer_name] has employees qualified and affiliated with your specific car model. You’ve invested a lot of money in your vehicle; don’t risk it with bad service just to save a buck. Come in and visit us today.

    10. Tire Rotation.

    Rotating your tires moves your wheels and tires from one position to another and ensures that they wear out evenly while driving in and around [resource_dealer_address type=city]. Neglecting tire rotation can lead to worn out tire threads and flat tires, and eventually costly and unnecessary repairs. Rotate your tires to save time and, more importantly, money!


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city] [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => 10 Serious Mistakes in Car Maintenance [post_excerpt] => Mistakes that might jeopardize the smooth operation of your vehicle. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 10-serious-mistakes-in-car-maintenance [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/10-serious-mistakes-in-car-maintenance/ [menu_order] => 33 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937476 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => 10 Signs You Need a New Car From [resource_dealer_name]

    10 Signs You Need a New Car From [resource_dealer_name]


    Car envy is a real thing in [resource_dealer_address type=city], and it can really cause you to make some rash decisions. If all of your friends in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] are getting new rides and you’re stuck in your old clunker, you’ll probably want to follow suit and get behind the wheel of something you’re proud of. On the other hand, you might be perfectly comfortable with your old clunker now that you’re done with monthly payments, but is that practical? Keep in mind that the longer you drive your car around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], the lower the resale value will be when you’re ready to sell. So it’s time to weigh your options: is it more beneficial to hold on to your car for a few more years, or will it make your life easier to trade it in now at [resource_dealer_name]? Here are 10 signs you might be ready for a new car.

    1. Your check engine light is always on.

    Your check engine light is not something that should be treated as a suggestion. If it’s on, there’s a reason. If you’re regularly visiting the [resource_dealer_name] service bay for repairs and your light is still on, you’re missing out on one of your car’s biggest safety features. In the event that something worse happens that requires immediate attention, your check engine light will not be able to warn you if it’s already on. This may not be a reason to drop what you’re doing and go buy a brand new [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes], but it might help jumpstart your shopping process.

    2. You’re not passing your inspections.

    In order to legally drive your vehicle, you need a valid inspection sticker. If you’re going in year after year and not passing, it might be a sign that you and your car should call it quits. Sure, you can pay for the repairs as a short-term solution to get that sticker, but if it keeps happening, it might be more worthwhile to think about moving on.

    3. You’re getting horrible gas mileage.

    The truth is, older cars just don’t have the fuel efficiency that newer ones do. You might not see this as a problem yet, but think about it -- with a new car, you could take all the money you’ll save on gas and put it towards your monthly payments. You might end up finding that you’re not paying too much more for something much newer.

    4. You’re always breaking down.

    If every time you go out in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], you have to worry about making it back home safely, is it worth it? Sure, your breakdowns might be minor and easily fixable now, but what if they start becoming more serious? What if you end up broken down on a deserted back road in the middle of a snowstorm with no cell reception in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]? A new car could save you the stress and potential danger that comes with driving a car that’s prone to breakdowns.

    5. You’re spending too much on repairs.

    Is it costing you more money to repair your car every time it breaks down than it would cost to replace it? The truth is, repair costs are just going to keep coming, regardless of how many times you visit the service bay at [resource_dealer_name]. Think about reallocating your money towards payments on a new car rather than repairs on an old one. It will help your bank account and your stress level.

    6. Your car has over [resource_toggle_verbiage us="100,000 miles" ca="150,000 km"].

    If your odometer is reading six digits, it probably means you’ve been taking pretty good care of your car. However, it also means that costly repairs are inevitable, if they haven’t started already. With more [resource_toggle_verbiage us="miles" ca="km"] comes more chance for error, so you might want to think about replacing your vehicle before things get worse.

    7. Rust has become second nature.

    Sure, when cars are old, they rust. If you’re not bothered by how it looks, that’s fine, but you might change your mind when the floor of your vehicle collapses in while you’re driving in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3]. Not only is rust cause for potential danger, it will also drastically decrease the resale value of your car.

    8. You don’t have the safety features you need.

    With advancements in vehicle technology come advancements in safety features. Sure, you might not need remote start or Bluetooth capabilities, but what about a backup camera? You may think you’re fine without some of these features, but that’s probably because you haven’t experienced life with them yet. Even if your backup camera stops just one potential fender bender, it will do wonders for your safety and for the state of your vehicle. Give us a call at [resource_dealer_phone type=new] to talk about what new technology might be right for you.

    9. You’ve undergone a lifestyle change.

    Maybe you’ve recently started a new job in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] with a longer commute and need something more fuel-efficient to take back and forth. Maybe you’ve started a family since your last vehicle purchase and need something like an SUV or a minivan to cart your kids back and forth to school, soccer practice, and dance lessons in [resource_dealer_address type=city]. There are a number of lifestyle changes that might cause you to need a new vehicle. If you can afford it, it’ll probably make you happier in the long run.

    10. You just want a new car.

    Again, car envy is a real thing. As models are updated each year, you might see something that really stands out to you and makes you think, this is the car I want. If you’ve done your research, you’ve started shopping around, and you know you can afford it, why not go for it? Come visit us at [resource_dealer_name] today to take the leap and find a new [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] for you.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    [resource_dealer_name] offers [resource_title]


    Selling your car online around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] is a good way to get top dollar for your vehicle, especially if you’re willing to negotiate. You can sell on auto specific sites or even on general interest sites like [resource_toggle_verbiage us="eBay" ca="Kijiji"] or Craigslist. Whichever you choose, you’ll want to be sure you’re making smart decisions so you can get the most bang for your buck and stay safe in the process. Here are ten tips for selling your car online.

    1. Gather the details

    Collect all of the pertinent information on the vehicle, like year, make, model, and VIN. You’ll also want to know if there are any outstanding recalls on the car. You’re not required by law to have recalls taken care of before a sale, but you may have no choice but to sacrifice some of the vehicle’s value for not having it taken care of.

    2. Detail the car

    Inside and out, the car should be cleaned and spotless before you take any photos. A dirty mess may deter buyers around [resource_dealer_address type=city] from seeing the true condition of the vehicle and could, in turn, affect sale price.

    3. Write a compelling description

    Be creative and don’t leave anything out. The more details you can give about your vehicle, the better. It can also be helpful to share your personal experience with the car and describe your favorite parts of driving it in and around [resource_dealer_address type=city].

    4. Take a lot of photos

    There is no such thing as too many pictures; they’re your biggest tools in selling your car. Be sure to show the interior and exterior, and don’t try to hide any flaws or imperfections. Be honest, but also try to highlight the vehicle’s features.

    5. Make a video ad in and around [resource_dealer_address type=city]

    Take your ad a step beyond photos and make your vehicle stand out with a walk-around video. You can show off the vehicle’s features in action and talk about it in detail to supplement the description. As a bonus, film it at a nice park or local hotspot in [resource_dealer_address type=city]

    6. Communicate with potential buyers

    Answer every call, text, and email promptly and answer all questions with patience and courtesy. It’s your job to provide an experience for the customer, and being responsive can sometimes make a difference in sale price.

    7. Price it right

    If you’re willing to negotiate, price your vehicle a little above what you’re hoping to get for it. If haggling isn’t your thing, make sure you’re pricing it reasonably so your firmness doesn’t deter potential buyers. Most buyers around [resource_dealer_address type=city] will come in wanting to negotiate, so you should know how you’re going to handle it before your first meeting.

    8. Have paperwork ready

    Keep the title, registration, and maintenance records handy. You never know when a buyer will contact you with a great offer. Always be prepared to sell.

    9. Vet potential buyers thoroughly and trust your gut

    Selling a car online can be risky; you don’t know what kinds of people will contact you looking to buy. Before meeting up with anyone, play it safe and vet each candidate thoroughly. Make sure any meetings are set in a public location around [resource_dealer_address type=city]. If something or someone feels off to you, trust your instincts and wait for the right buyer.

    10. Meet in a public place for a test drive

    No sale is worth risking your safety. Whether you have complete trust in the buyer or not, always meet in a public place around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] to conduct a test drive or finalize a deal.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => 10 Tips for Selling Your Car Online [post_excerpt] => If you’re willing to negotiate. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 10-tips-for-selling-your-car-online [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/10-tips-for-selling-your-car-online/ [menu_order] => 35 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937478 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => 10 Ways to Spot a Water Damaged Vehicle In [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    10 Ways to Spot a Water Damaged Vehicle In [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    10 Ways to Spot a Water Damaged Vehicle in [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    Purchasing a pre-owned vehicle from [resource_dealer_name] can be a great investment. If kept in good condition, a used vehicle can be just as reliable and more cost-effective than a brand new one. However, with all the benefits of buying used come a few risks, especially if you are buying from a private owner in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3]. One thing that’s important to check for before you purchase a used vehicle is water damage, since this can cause serious problems down the line if it hasn’t already. However, water damage can be tricky to spot, since the more obvious signs can be easy for an owner to hide. Here are ten things to check for to cover all your bases when it comes to checking for water damage.

    1. A Musty Odor or an Overly Strong Air Freshener

    Mildew, low tide, and musty odors are all signs that a car has probably been exposed to a great deal of water. Once these smells have seeped in, it is very hard to completely get rid of them. If you’re looking at a used vehicle, get in and close all the doors and windows. Sit in the car for a few minutes and then crack the door open just a bit to see if you smell anything unusual. Make sure you turn on the air conditioner, as well, to see if there are any strange smells coming from the vents. You should also be cautious of overly strong air fresheners, which are often used to cover up smells associated with water damage. This is the easiest way to spot water damage in [resource_dealer_address type=state], but there are other telltale signs, as well.

    2. Mismatched Carpets

    If a section of a vehicle’s interior is a different shade or appears newer than the surrounding carpet, it could be a sign that the car has seen water damage. Check underneath every seat. Look for material that has been cut and sewn over. Compare the material on the doors and roof to see if they all have the same wear and age. There is a chance the carpet might have been replaced to increase the value of the car, but it is not typically the first priority, so proceed with caution and make sure you inquire about it.

    3. Moisture in Electronics and Gauges

    Inspect the car’s electronics and gauges in the instrument panel. Look for moisture that has been trapped behind the plastic. Grab your flashlight and look under the dashboard and in the console. Condensation behind the radio face or gauge cluster could mean the car was flooded.

    4. Damp Spots

    Check the interior for past water damage by patting down the car for any damp spots. Pay special attention under the seats because these areas are harder for the seller to dry. If you do manage to find a damp spot, try to lift the carpet and check the padding. The seller might be able to dry out the carpet, but foam padding retains moisture for much longer. Don’t forget to check the carpet in the trunk, as well. Water tends to collect in the trunk and even a thorough inspection might miss it.

    5. Excessive Rust or Corrosion

    Corrosion and rust are important to look for when checking for water damage. Rust is natural, but a 2012 vehicle shouldn’t have the rusting of a 1999 [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes]. Corrosion, meanwhile, eats away at the car’s materials even after it has dried. Make sure to check for rust and corrosion on both the exterior and the interior; check hinges, screws, springs, latches, and brackets, any of which could indicate prolonged contact with water. Use a mirror to check the springs under the seat, as well.

    6. Fogging in Headlamps and Taillights

    As much as a seller in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] might want to cover up water damage on his or her car, some areas just won’t dry. Look at all the lamps on the car. When water has accumulated inside of them they will appear foggy, similar to the dashboard you checked earlier. Check the headlights, taillights, and exterior mirrors. Even if the car has been partially flooded, these lamps will show signs of it.

    7. Look for Dirt Build-up

    If a car has been submerged in water near [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] that water was probably carrying all kinds of debris, like sand, dirt, and grass. After the water goes down, a lot of this debris will stay, and it’s very hard to remove all of it. Check the trunk, under the dashboard, under and inside the glove compartment, under the seats, around the wiring, in the engine nooks, and under the spare tires. If you find any kind of dirt, grass, or other debris, your prospective purchase might have been sitting in water for a stretch of time.

    8. Test-drive the Car

    Test the car thoroughly by taking it for a test drive in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4]; this is the best way to see if the electrical system has been compromised. First, check the wires under the dashboard. If they’re rough but still delicate, this could be a sign of water damage. To be sure, take the car out for a drive near [resource_dealer_address type=city]. Listen to the ignition for any strange sounds. Check the headlights, turn signals, and dashboard lights. Turn on the wipers and air conditioner to make sure they work how they should. Lastly, check the radio. If the system looks too new for the age of the car, it may have been replaced due to water damage. Again, like with the carpet, ask the seller about it before you take the car home.

    9. Get an Expert’s Opinion

    Experts and mechanics can often spot water damage in just a few minutes. They may do a more thorough inspection and check hidden electrical parts for original parts if they are suspicious. Although you will have to pay for this, it is well worth it if it can prevent a serious problem with your purchase down the road. An expert at [resource_dealer_name] can examine places you might not be able to, like mechanical parts and pumps. You have invested a lot in your vehicle, so you don’t want to buy a damaged car that will cost you thousands in the long run.

    10. Check the Title and do a VIN Check

    Checking the title will let you see if the car was in a flood-damaged area. Check for a stamp that reads “salvage” or “flood.” “Salvaged” means that the car was considered too damaged to be worth fixing. Ask for a vehicle history report so you can see detailed documentation of the car. This is the easiest way to see if a car has been seriously damaged by a flood, but sellers may not always be honest. You should always make an effort to do a personal examination of the car you’re thinking of buying.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    11 Red Flags for Used Vehicles For Sale Around [resource_dealer_address type=city] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1]


    When shopping near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], make sure you’re buying a reliable pre-owned vehicle--not a fortune in repair and service costs.

    11 Red Flags for Used Vehicles Near [resource_dealer_address type=city] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1]

    1. Ugly on the outside? Probably on the inside too.

    Whether it was purchased in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], or elsewhere, if a vehicle has glaring problems at first look--dents, rust, cracks--it probably hasn’t been looked over by a service team. What does that mean? There may be mechanical problems as well. Get someone to look under the hood before you make that final purchase.

    2. Speaking of rust…

    For most used cars in [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], a little bit of rust isn’t bad, unless you’re someone who needs their vehicle to look brand new. In that case, factor in what it’s going to cost you to replace the body panels. For everyone else: how much rust is on that car? If it’s so bad that you would have to replace sections of the frame, you may want to walk away.

    3. It’s not quite the right shade of red.

    Is the paint mismatched anywhere on the vehicle? That’s a good indication the car has been in an accident. People living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] should be aware that this may or may not be a deal-breaker--an accident is not a death sentence for the vehicle. But if the seller is trying to hide the fact that there was an incident, that’s not a good sign.

    4. That dashboard is lit like a Christmas tree.

    When you take a test drive around [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], are all the lights on the dashboard lit up? Sure, the Check Engine light may have been triggered by an errant sensor or the gas cap. It may also indicate a major issue with the vehicle. Get it checked out before you decide to take on the vehicle and any repair costs attached.

    5. It’s too young to be that damaged.

    How old is that vehicle? Is it five years old or younger? And if so, has the transmission or engine been replaced? Start asking questions before you start driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2]. Those components are supposed to last a long time. A replacement means the vehicle is a bad one or the driver has abused the vehicle before handing it off to you.

    6. Is the seller the worst backseat driver?

    The test drive is when you put the vehicle through its paces, especially if it’s a pre-owned vehicle. You should take it around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], through high speeds, merging lanes and whatever type of roads you deal with on a daily basis. If the seller wants to control the test drive and keep you from really testing the vehicle, that’s a bad sign.

    7. And do they provide service records?

    The vehicle you choose comes with a history from being driven around [resource_dealer_address type=city] and you should know the details. Ask the seller for service records to ensure the vehicle received proper, regular maintenance. If the seller is reluctant or outright refuses to provide the records, they may have something to hide.

    8. How low is too low?

    If you’re purchasing a used vehicle that means price is important to you. When you’re on a budget, a vehicle for dirt cheap can seem like a blessing. But if the price seems way, way too good to be true, it likely is. People living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] should be wary of a low, low, low price, which may mean the seller wants to get rid of the vehicle fast and that means high service costs for you.

    9. Do the fees seem a little...much?

    Does the vehicle have an itemized list of costs? Take a look at it. All vehicle transactions are going to include fees to cover tax, DMV business and other costs of business. But if you start to see additional mark-ups without explanation, ask some questions. If the seller doesn’t have a good reason for the increase, reconsider.

    10. Manufacturers issue recalls for a reason.

    Has the manufacturer issued any recalls for that make and model? And has the seller had them taken care of? They issue recalls to keep drivers and those around them safe. If they haven’t been addressed you could be in danger on the road.

    11. A few other things to look out for...

    Do you see condensation behind the radio face or gauge cluster? Are the carpets mismatched? Those are signs the car may have been flooded. Check the windows: different labels can indicate someone broke into the car. Then you’ll want to make sure nothing vital was stripped out of the vehicle. Are the tires different sizes or models? That could lead to the alignment being off.


    Getting a per-owned vehicle in [resource_dealer_address type=state] can be a great way to get a new car for a price well-suited to your budget. Just keep all these things in mind to ensure you’re not also buying a fortune in repair costs or worse--another new vehicle in three months.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => 11 Red Flags for Used Vehicles [post_excerpt] => Make sure you’re buying a reliable pre-owned vehicle. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 11-red-flags-for-used-vehicles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/11-red-flags-for-used-vehicles/ [menu_order] => 37 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937480 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => Can Car Dealers In [resource_dealer_address type=state] Let Defects Go Without A Recall?

    Can Car Dealers In [resource_dealer_address type=state] Let Defects Go Without A Recall?


    In [resource_dealer_address type=state] a recall happens when a car manufacturer or the [resource_toggle_verbiage us='National Highway Traffic Safety Administration' ca='government'] deems that a car model or models have a defect that does not adhere to safety standards, such as faulty seatbelts, steering components, or airbags.

    For more information on common defects, see [resource_dealer_name] 10 Most Common Vehicle Defects page.

    If your car has been recalled, then the car manufacturer or dealer that you purchased your vehicle from will notify you through a letter. If you purchased your vehicle used, you may not receive a letter, as the manufacturer may send it to the original owner first. So, it is important to stay up to date with current recalls. For a free check try our Recall Check Tool. This notification will describe the defect in detail, any safety hazard it poses, and instructions on what to do next.

    If the defect is safety related, government laws [resource_toggle_verbiage us='and the NHTSA will' ca='will'] require that the car manufacturer perform a recall. Manufacturers cannot let defects go without a recall if it will be a safety issue for users. Manufacturers can often choose to issue a voluntary recall, [resource_toggle_verbiage us='or wait until the NHTSA requires them to do so' ca='or wait until they are required to do so']. It is in the public interest to get the defects and information to the public as quickly as possible before a serious accident occurs on the road around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4].

    Car manufacturers will often work closely with [resource_dealer_name] to make sure that they provide repairs, free of charge on recalled [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] vehicles. Dealerships are required by law to service the vehicle. Often, the recall letter will detail where you can take your vehicle to be serviced. [resource_toggle_verbiage us='The NHTSA' ca='Transport Canada'] looks over every safety recall to make sure that manufacturers have provided users with free and effective remedies. Also, contact [resource_toggle_verbiage us='the NHTSA' ca='a Transport Canada agent'] or [resource_dealer_name] if you feel that the problem was not fixed or if there is another problem related to the defect.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => Can Car Dealers Let Defects Go Without A Recall? [post_excerpt] => It is important to stay up to date with current recalls. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => can-car-dealers-let-defects-go-without-a-recall [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/can-car-dealers-let-defects-go-without-a-recall/ [menu_order] => 38 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [31] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937481 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => [resource_title]

    [resource_title]


    If you live around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] [resource_dealer_address type=state], most, if not all brake problems, should be evaluated and repaired by a trusted, experienced mechanic. However, it helps to know what to communicate to your mechanic should any problems arise.

    Likewise, it’s comforting to know that when something does go wrong you know how to properly handle the situation. Some brake problems may require you to stop driving right away, while others could wait a few days until it’s convenient for you to take it to the mechanic.

    Either way, vehicle brakes are not something to leave to chance. While repairs can be expensive, the cost of ignoring brake problems could be much worse. You owe it to yourself, your passengers and your fellow travelers to maintain your vehicle’s braking system while driving around [resource_dealer_address type=state].

    [resource_dealer_name] Explains Five Common Brake Problems:

    1. Loud, unnatural noises

    If your brakes are working properly, you should not be able to hear them. One of the first indications of an issue with your braking system is obnoxious screeching, grinding or squealing while driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city].

    Not only is this sound embarrassing, but it also means that it’s time to have your brake pads and shoes inspected. Letting this problem go will put undue stress on the rest of your braking system, resulting in more costly repairs in the long run.

    2. Brake pedal pulses or steering wheel vibrations when braking

    Should you let problem number one go for too long, you are likely to start experiencing awkward brake pedal activity or unnerving steering wheel vibrations at high speeds.

    These are symptoms of a damaged rotor. This can be due to rust, warping of the rotor from excessive braking at high speeds, or to worn down brake pads.

    In [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state], near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] you can fix a rotor by resurfacing it, if there is enough play, or replacing it. It’s not an inexpensive fix, but it’s one you can’t ignore. To keep your rotors in good health, simply replace your brake pads at reasonable intervals.

    3. Veering while braking

    If your car pulls to one side when braking, you are most likely experiencing what is known as “caliper freezing.” Not freezing in the sense of temperature, but of damage caused by lack of lubrication.

    Calipers have small pistons that apply brake pressure to the wheel. Should debris cause corrosion and damage to the bore, a piston could get stuck, resulting in uneven caliper pressure.

    Unfortunately, once this happens you’ll have to replace your caliper.

    4. A “soft” brake pedal

    Other than outright failure, in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] this problem is one of the most urgent symptoms of a braking system issue. In fact, a soft or spongy feeling when applying pressure to the brakes is an indicator of imminent brake failure.

    If you need to press down unreasonably hard or pump your brakes to get the desired affect, stop driving and get to a repair shop as soon as possible. This almost always means you have a leak somewhere in your braking system. A leak can happen internally or externally for a few different reasons, but the loss of brake fluid means a loss of braking capability, so it should be fixed immediately.

    5 . Noxious burning smell

    As long as you don’t drive like you’re in a scene from Fast & Furious, your brakes should never be giving off any weird smells.

    This is a sign of overheating and vastly reduces the lifetime of your braking components. Rapid cooling on overheating brakes can even reduce the effectiveness of your brake pads, spelling disaster for your next drive.

    Should your brakes be giving off excessive heat or weird smells for no apparent reason while driving in [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], have them inspected as soon as possible. It’s often a quick adjustment to make sure brake pads and calipers are in the right position.

    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


    [post_title] => Common Vehicle Braking Problems Explained [post_excerpt] => Vehicle brakes are not something to leave to chance. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => common-vehicle-braking-problems-explained [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.heningertoyota.com/resource/common-vehicle-braking-problems-explained/ [menu_order] => 39 [post_type] => resource_center [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 937482 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-26 19:37:25 [post_content] => Do I Need a New Car Battery From [resource_dealer_name]?

    Do I Need a New Car Battery From [resource_dealer_name]?


    7 signs your car battery needs to be replaced

    7 signs your car battery needs to be replaced at [resource_dealer_name]

    The last thing any vehicle owner wants is to hop into their car while in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and turn the key-- only for it not to start due to a dead battery.

    Everyday life takes its toll on a car’s battery. Vibrations from driving around [resource_dealer_address type=city], supporting accessories like GPS and MP3 players, extreme temperatures, short trips to [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] or underuse and overcharging all affect the life of a car battery. That’s why car batteries typically last about 4 – 5 years before they need replacement.

    Keep in mind: colder climates are conducive to battery longevity, so battery life varies depending on where you live.

    How do you make sure you don’t end up in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] stranded with a dead battery? The trick is paying attention to your vehicle to catch a dying battery before your car won’t start.

    Here are seven signs your car battery needs to be replaced:

    1. Age:

    If your battery is 3-4 years old, it may be in jeopardy of dying out even if nothing seems wrong. Have [resource_dealer_name] check it out or keep an eye on it yourself for other signs that the battery is on its last leg.

    2. Check Engine Light is On:

    Your check engine light could be on for a number of reasons. One culprit? Your battery needs replacing.

    3. Low Battery Fluid Level:

    Look in the translucent part of the battery case. The fluid level should not be below the energy conductors, or lead plates.

    4. Swelling Battery Case:

    A swollen battery case is usually the result of extreme heat. This can shorten the life of your battery.

    5. Leaking/Corrosion:

    You may see some chemical build-up on an old car battery. Corrosion can be removed with a solution of baking soda and water. It should be handled safely; either with gloves and goggles or by a mechanic at [resource_dealer_name] in [resource_dealer_address type=city].

    6. Slow Engine Crank:

    If your car takes longer to start than normal when you turn the key, your car battery may be on its way out.

    7. Smell:

    When a car battery is frozen or overcharged, it often emits sulfuric acid. If you smell something like rotten eggs under the hood of the car, get your battery replaced immediately at [resource_dealer_name]. Sulfuric acid can eat away at other parts of the engine and result in a major problems for your vehicle.


    Checking your car battery should be part of routine maintenance for your vehicle. However, everyday life and wear and tear can stir up problems between service appointments. If you experience any of the signs of a dead car battery, make a service appointment here, or call to speak with a service specialist at [resource_dealer_phone type=service] .


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    7 Car Smells You Might Notice In [resource_dealer_address type= city ] And What They Mean


    Everyone around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] loves that new car smell, right? Well, if you don't keep up on maintenance, your car could start producing some less savory smells instead. Being aware of the smells your car produces can help you diagnose problems before you see them or before they become irreversible. Here is a list of 7 car smells [resource_dealer_name] doesn't want you to ignore.

    1. Rotten Eggs

    The gasoline that fuels your car contains trace amounts of sulfur. This creates a by-product called hydrogen sulfide, which smells like the eggs you forgot in your trunk for a week after grocery shopping in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4].

    The catalytic converter is a crucial part of your exhaust system because it takes this by-product and converts it into [resource_toggle_verbiage us="odor" ca="odour"]less sulfur dioxide. If you start smelling rotten eggs when your car is running, your catalytic converter needs to be replaced. Unfortunately, around [resource_dealer_address type=state] this is usually a pricy fix, but it may be covered under warranty. For more information, call [resource_dealer_name] at [resource_dealer_phone type= service].

    2. Maple Syrup

    People living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] usually aren't getting a whiff of maple syrup around the car. If you do, you could be leaking coolant. Coolant contains ethylene glycol, which smells sweet but is actually very toxic.

    The fix could be as simple as tightening a loose radiator cap or replacing a hose or gasket. If you notice the smell inside the car, it's likely that you have a bad heater core.


    3. Fire and Brimstone

    If you're driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and you smell fire and brimstone you can relax; it's not the end just yet. What you smell is sulfur from a leaky gear housing or transmission. The gear lube in these components of the drivetrain contain sulfur compounds that act as extreme pressure lubricants.

    Over time, the lube will start to deteriorate and even leak, emitting a sulfur smell. You can check for a leak by inspecting any oil substance left behind by your car. If it smells like sulfur, it's time to visit a mechanic.

    4. Burning Moldy Newspaper

    If you smell a smoldering, moldy newspaper, you're either passing by a [resource_dealer_address type=city] [resource_dealer_address type=state] millennial spring-cleaning bonfire or you've got clutch problems.

    The smell results from friction material actually burning off the clutch as it slips. If you smell this under normal driving conditions around [resource_dealer_address type=city], your clutch is failing and needs to be replaced.

    5. Gas Station

    The only time the smell of gas should be in the air around [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] is when you are refueling your car. A questionable gasoline [resource_toggle_verbiage us="odor" ca="odour"] coming from your car is an indication of a leak. The most likely culprits are a fuel injection line or fuel tank vent hose.

    6. Locker Room

    Here at [resource_dealer_name] we all remember what the high school gym locker room used to smell like in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], and you probably do too. You probably thought you left it behind for good. However, your A/C unit could have other plans.

    If you smell that familiar sour dankness in your cabin driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] it probably means there's mildew in your A/C vents. There are a few ways to solve this problem, the simplest being running air through the vents with the A/C off. If you can't dry it out yourself, it's best to have a technician take care of it for you.

    7. Burned Carpet

    People living near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] shouldn't be smelling burned carpet while driving. If you smell burned carpet while you're driving, your brake pads are overheated. While this is normal under intense braking conditions like driving down a mountain pass, you shouldn't smell this under typical driving conditions around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3].

    The most common cause for this is a seized caliper piston, but brakes can overheat for a number of reasons. Maintaining your brakes is the best way to avoid problems like these.

    There are many smells in and around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], some good, some bad. Whether we like it or not, we get to experience them all. If your car is in good health, it should be emitting no smells, at least none that are abhorrently unpleasant. Being aware of what the bad smells are and what they mean can help you diagnose a problem before it gets worse. If you are ever unsure about the smells coming from your vehicle, stop in to [resource_dealer_name] and get it checked out.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    6 Great Battery Maintenance Tips For Those Living in [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    Did you know that most breakdowns are the result of insufficient power to keep a vehicle in operation?

    Maintaining car battery health will not only increase battery lifespan, but also protect you from inconvenient breakdowns that could leave you stranded on the side of the road in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2].

    You may be at an even greater risk if you go several days at a time without driving. As your car runs, the alternator recharges the battery, which helps maintain a strong current. As a vehicle sits over time it can lose this charge, sometimes dipping below the threshold for maintaining a current. The more frequently this happens, the quicker your battery life deteriorates, increasing the likelihood of a worrisome breakdown.

    Here are 5 things you can do to proactively maintain your battery life:

    1. When Possible near [resource_dealer_address type=city] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], Park in a Garage

    Keeping your car battery out of the elements in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] is crucial to maintaining a stable charge. Extreme cold can make it difficult for a car to start; this may be a symptom of waning battery health. Extreme heat actually causes battery fluid to evaporate. This leads to overcharging and drastically shortens battery life.

    During periods of temperature extremes, keep your car in an enclosed garage if possible to provide a stable setting conducive to battery health.

    2. Keep it Clean

    Keeping your battery clean does wonders for its performance. That crusty white build-up that we’re all too familiar with limits the ability of the alternator to do its job. Without a proper charge, your battery will become less effective the longer you use it and will almost certainly result in a breakdown or a car that doesn’t start.


    3. Add Water

    Mixing water with something that conducts electricity might sound dangerous, but in reality, every car battery requires fluid to help maintain a healthy equilibrium for proper charge.

    Some cars have permanently sealed “maintenance-free” batteries that cannot be opened. However, if you have a battery that isn’t maintenance-free, you can add distilled water to increase battery life. This is of particular importance in the summer months when hot weather causes battery fluid to evaporate. Low battery fluid levels will lead to damaged cells from overcharging.

    4. Secure it

    Unfortunately car batteries can’t be tossed around in the same manner as your household Duracells or Energizers. They contain several components, including fluid and acid, that can leak if the battery is knocked around enough. This can cause irreversible harm to your engine.

    The Service Center at [resource_dealer_name] recommends simply checking every now and then to ensure that your battery is seated properly and is not susceptible to being jarred around. Keep the battery tray clean and, if necessary, secure it with some industrial strength rubber bungee cords.

    5. Harness the Sun

    If you drive infrequently around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], or know that your car will be sitting idle for any length of time, you might invest in a solar charger. There are similar chargers that can run off any wall outlet, but a solar charger is completely independent, renewable, and can be used anywhere.

    Once installed, the solar panel simply sits on your dash charging your vehicle battery as needed. Most external chargers on the market will shut off and re-start automatically depending on voltage to prevent overcharging.

    6. Tuck It In with an Insulation Blanket

    A little-known maintenance tip is to protect your car battery with insulation. In recent years there has been a shrinking of space under the hoods of newer vehicles. This is a result of design that facilitates better aerodynamics and fuel efficiency. The problem is that these design features can actually reduce airflow in an engine.

    Insulating your car battery will protect it from both extreme cold and extreme heat. Common sense might have you purchase a bigger battery to maintain charge for longer. However, a bigger battery will only reduce airflow and increase the rate of failure. Your best bet is to go with a smaller battery that leaves room on the tray for an insulation material.


    Maintaining your car battery is a simple and easy way to keep your car running well in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] and protect it from breakdowns. In addition to this, when you perform proper maintenance, you’ll keep your car battery out of the landfill for longer. Disposing of the corrosive and toxic material in car batteries is a difficult and time-consuming process. Keeping your vehicle battery in good health is just another way you can make a difference in preserving the environment.


    [resource_dealer_name] is a [resource_dealer_list_dealer_makes] dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    5 DIY Maintenance Tips Anyone Can Do around [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]


    Here at [resource_dealer_name], we love our vehicles. We like to accessorize, customize, detail, and polish them. To truly show the love, some of us around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] even like to do minor maintenance tasks to keep our vehicles in tip-top shape.

    If you're looking to spend a little quality time with your vehicle this weekend in and about [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], here are five DIY car maintenance projects to keep you busy!

    1. Windshield Wipers

    Around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], windshield wipers should be replaced about every six months, but many drivers let them go far too long to avoid an even more expensive repair later down the road. The good news is that you'll only need about 15 minutes to do this on your own with no tools at all. You can find the wipers you'll need in your owner's manual.

    Keep in mind that you are likely to use your windshield wipers more during certain parts of the year, like fall and winter, so plan your replacement schedule accordingly.

    2. Engine Air Filter

    Your car's engine air filter is what keeps dirt and other unwanted particles from getting into the engine while it's running. While driving around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=4], a dirty filter can hurt both your gas mileage and engine performance. Replacing an air filter is about as easy as it gets. It's as simple as reading a page in your owner's manual to find the correct section, taking the lid off the box, switching out filters, and putting the lid back on.

    [resource_dealer_name] recommends that you replace your air filter once a year or every [resource_toggle_verbiage us="12,000 miles" ca="20,000 km"]. Filters are usually cheap, depending on your vehicle, and this task can also be completed with no tools at all in your driveway or garage in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2] or [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3], [resource_dealer_address type=state]. Be wary though, as cabin air filters can be more complex than this, and are best left to a professional.

    3. Battery Maintenance in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state]

    There is something about electricity and its potential for serious harm that keeps car owners in [resource_dealer_address type=city] at a safe distance from their batteries. Never fear! As long as you disconnect the battery properly (negative node first!) you'll be fine.

    Maintaining a strong battery connection is important to keep your car running smoothly throughout daily wear and tear in [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_address type=state]. A battery is one of the driving forces behind your vehicle. A simple visual inspection will tell you if it's time to clean your battery. The crunchy white residue that builds over time will keep your car from starting properly and, reduce the life of your battery and other starting components.

    For this task, you'll need a few items: a rag, some wire brushes, wrenches to loosen connectors, and corrosion removal fluid. Some say you can substitute Coca-Cola here. You could, but we wouldn't recommend it.

    The cleaning process shouldn't take longer than 20 minutes and, assuming you have a wrench and wire brush lying around, investment in tools will be minimal.

    4. Oil and Oil Filter

    Performing your own oil changes around [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1] is perhaps one of the dirtier and more involved DIY tasks. However, doing so, will give you peace of mind and help you to get better acquainted with the machine you use.

    Convention would have you change your oil every three months or [resource_toggle_verbiage us="3,000 miles" ca="5,000 km"], but the fact is that today we have higher quality oil and more efficient engines. Most cars even have oil quality meters, but you can always double-check by eyeing the quality on the dipstick. You might even be able to get up to [resource_toggle_verbiage us="5,000 miles" ca="8,000 km"] out of a single oil change.

    You'll need to buy some oil (check your owner's manual for specs, and speak with one of our Service Specialists to find out which is best for your needs), as well as a ratchet, oil filter wrench, oil pan, and funnel. The whole process takes about 30-45 minutes.

    [resource_dealer_name] recommends that before you start: Make sure your car is cool. Hot oil will burn, and most likely melt through your plastic oil pan, creating a mess that is nearly impossible to clean completely.

    5. Spark Plugs

    Replacing your own spark plugs can save you a lot of money. It takes some patience, but it's a pretty simple task.

    You'll need a spark plug for every cylinder your car has (4, 6, or 8) and they should be replaced about every [resource_toggle_verbiage us="30,000 miles" ca="50,000 km"]. The proper gap size for the plug can be found in your owner's manual. Just bring this number to our Parts [resource_toggle_verbiage us="Center" ca="Centre"] and they should have you in and out in no time.

    Note: Do not to unhook all the spark plugs at once – they have to be done one at a time.

    [resource_toggle_verbiage us="Tools involved include a ratchet, 12-inch socket arm, and spark plug socket" ca="Some tools involved include a ratchet and spark plug socket"] (this is deeper than the typical socket). The fix should take 20 to 30 minutes and the spark plugs are relatively inexpensive. Always buy your parts from a reputable dealer, like [resource_dealer_name] in [resource_dealer_address type=city], [resource_dealer_address type=state], to make sure are getting the best for you investment.


    Performing basic maintenance will give you a better relationship with your car and can be a great hobby. It's easy to forget that you are operating a piece of heavy machinery on a daily basis. By understanding more about how your car operates, you will be more apt to know when something is failing or if more significant repair is required. Of course, if a task is too involved don't hesitate to give us a visit and we'll be more than happy to help!


    [resource_dealer_name] is a dealership serving areas within and bordering the [resource_dealer_address type=city] [resource_dealer_address type=state] region.


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    Buying a car for the first time in [resource_dealer_address type=state] can feel like an overwhelming experience. That’s why we put together this list of essentials every car buyer near [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=1], [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=2], and [resource_dealer_nearby_city city=3] should be armed with before they step on the lot at [resource_dealer_name].





    What’s inside?

    + A road map for car-buying success.

    + Realistic, actionable steps that anyone can take when starting their first car buying experience at [resource_dealer_name].

    CLICK BELOW TO GET STARTED

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